DYNAMIC AFRICA

African-based news, lifestyle & popular culture platform that brings you stories and information concerning Africa and the African diaspora. Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is a rich content-driven creative space with a Pan-African outlook established as an expressive platform for African experiences, African culture and African stories.


Dynamic Africa is a diverse multimedia platform, which curates global ideas, memes, attitudes and other phenomena that shape popular culture, with both a local and global African perspective.




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Posts tagged "sierra leone"

Vintage postcard photograph of ‘Wilberforce Street’ in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

sabisierraleone:

River No. 2

(via thefemaletyrant)

WOMEN’S MONTH VIEWING: Rope Documentary: Workshop in Bo, Sierra Leone

Musicians and activists Ahmed “Genda” Nyei, from Liberia, and Nigerian-German singer Nneka Egbuna’s non-profit organization ROPE is a platform aimed at developing youth in Africa by means of artistic and creative expression, all whilst equipping them with skillsets to both enhance and transform their lives. 

In 2012, the pair began a project in Bo, Sierra Leone focusing on young women who were affected by the civil war in the country and are part of WAGA - the War Affected Girls and Adults, providing a workshop on design, tailoring and foundational business knowledge. The events of the project are shown in this documentary put together by the founders and their organization.

AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

DYNAMIC AFRICA MIX #2: WOMEN’S MONTH MUSIC MIX

A quick lil’ mix I put together in celebration of August being Women’s Month (in SA) with artists from around the continent representing some of the latest sounds of women artists from South Africa, Nigeria, Angola, Mozambique, and Algeria and Sierra Leone via the UK.

TRACKLIST:

  • Yadi - Guillotine
  • Zaki Ibrahim - Draw the Line
  • Laura Mvula - That’s Alright
  • Temi DollFace - Pata Pata
  • Goldie Harvey ft AY - Skibobo
  • DJ Zinhle ft Busiswa - My Name Is
  • Duke Dumont ft A*M*E - Need U (100%)
  • Lebo Mathosa - Ntozabantu
  • Lizha James & Perola - Leva Boy

Hope you’ve been enjoying the Women’s Month posts!

Photo by J.D. Okhai Ojeikere

AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

MIXCLOUD | SOUNDCLOUD | MUSIC TAG | MUSIC MIXES

WOMEN’S MONTH NEWS: Isha Johansen has been confirmed as the new president of the Sierra Leone Football Association.

At 48, Johansen (pictured left) joins Burundi’s Lydia Nsekera (pictured right) as the only two women to occupy the position of president of a football association. Nsekera has been president of the Fédération de Football du Burundi since 2004, and since 2009 has been a member of the International Olympic Committee.

(more on this story)

AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) has told Malta to pay thousands of euros in compensation to two African migrants whose rights were violated.

A Somali woman who had a miscarriage during her detention in 2011 is to receive 30,000 euros (£26,000; $40,000), plus 3,000 euros in costs.

A man alleged to be from Sierra Leone is to receive 27,000 euros in total.

The court said the woman’s prison conditions were “degrading”. Malta is a target for boatloads of migrants.

Earlier this month Malta cancelled flights it had booked to return migrants to Libya, after an emergency intervention by the ECHR.

The court in Strasbourg issued rulings on Tuesday concerning Aslya Aden Ahmed, a Somali national, and Ibrahim Suso Musa, allegedly from Sierra Leone.

In Ms Ahmed’s case, it is the first time the court has ruled against Malta for violation of Article Three of the European Convention on Human Rights - prohibition of inhuman or degrading treatment - concerning migrant detention conditions.

The judges criticised conditions at Lyster Barracks - the holding centre - where migrants were exposed to cold, a lack of female staff, lack of access to open air, denial of exercise for long periods and poor food.

flashinglghts:

Visual Anthropology Photo Essay - Corpus: Mining the Border, Sierra Leone, by Danny Hoffman 2013

John Goba, Sierra Leonean artist.

Of Mende origin, John Goba was born into the hermetic milieu of women’s Bondo Society, in which his grandmother played an important role.

Goba came of age under her protection, and at the end of his period of initiation, he settled in Mountain Cut, a district in Freetown. There, when he was about thirty, he experienced a revelation that prompted him to begin making masks for the Ode-lay initiation rituals and masquerades that had sprung up in Freetown in the 1970s. 

Ode-lay masks and dress are characterized by an extraordinary ornamental exuberance, incorporating unexpected materials (such as Christmas tree ornaments) to achieve spectacular effects. 

Goba’s first masks, made of wood and brightly coloured with industrial paint, initially followed Ode-lay customs.  As he became more experienced, he began to create sculptures with greater freedom.  

Goba’s imagery is inspired by the traditional lore and mysteries of his environment and his sculptures are a skilful blend of figures borrowed from time-honoured tales and his own fantasies. A multitude of porcupine quills invariably protrude from the main characters of his tableaux, as if assuring their protection and forbidding any access to the heart—or secret core—of the work.

Each sculpture, Goba likes to say, has its own private history to which only the artist has the key.

yourhue:

Afro-Cubans and Sierra Leoneans bridge the gap in documentary, They Are We

Can a family separated for 170 years by the transatlantic slave trade sing and dance its way back together again? THEY ARE WE tells a story of survival against the odds, and how determination and shared humanity can triumph over the bleakest of histories.

#towatch

(via blackfilm)

sabisierraleone:

Reggae version of “High We Exalt Thee, Realm of the Free”
————————————————————————————————————————
National anthem of Sierra Leone
————————————————————————————————————————
Lyrics: Clifford Nelson Fyle
Original Music Melody: John Akar
Harmony & Original Arrangement Logie E. K. Wright
Adopted 1961

“High We Exalt Thee, Realm of the Free” is the national anthem of Sierra Leone. It was written by Clifford Nelson Fyle and composed by John Akar. It was adopted as the national anthem in 1961 when the country became independent replacing God Save The Queen.[1] The Constitution of Sierra Leone, 1991, makes it the responsibility of every citizen of Sierra Leone to “respect its ideals and its institutions”[2] including the national anthem.

Lyrics

High we exalt thee, realm of the free;
Great is the love we have for thee;
Firmly united ever we stand,
Singing thy praise, O native land.
We raise up our hearts and our voices on high,
The hills and the valleys re-echo our cry;
Blessing and peace be ever thine own,
Land that we love, our Sierra Leone.

One with a faith that wisdom inspires,
One with a zeal that never tires;
Ever we seek to honour thy name,
Ours is the labour, thine the fame.
We pray that no harm on thy children may fall,
That blessing and peace may descend on us all;
So may we serve thee ever alone,
Land that we love, our Sierra Leone.

Knowledge and truth our forefathers spread,
Mighty the nations whom they led;
Mighty they made thee, so too may we
Show forth the good that is ever in thee.
We pledge our devotion, our strength and our might,
Thy cause to defend and to stand for thy right;
All that we have be ever thine own,
Land that we love, our Sierra Leone.

fuckyeaafricans:

Happy 52nd Independence day to Sierra Leone!!

(via sabisierraleone)

Freetown, Sierra Leone

(via sabisierraleone)

Men in Sierra Leone sorting kola nuts, a bitter tasting caffeine-containing fruit found on the cola trees of West Africa.
Kola nuts have various uses in many different West African societies, ranging from ceremonial offerings to healing practices.
In 1800s, American pharmacist John Pemberton introduced them to the Western world by combining kola nuts with sugar, carbonated water and other ingredients to make the first cola soft drink in the West. Coca-Cola no longer uses kola nuts in its recipe.
Photo by bruce_geisert on Flickr.

Men in Sierra Leone sorting kola nuts, a bitter tasting caffeine-containing fruit found on the cola trees of West Africa.

Kola nuts have various uses in many different West African societies, ranging from ceremonial offerings to healing practices.

In 1800s, American pharmacist John Pemberton introduced them to the Western world by combining kola nuts with sugar, carbonated water and other ingredients to make the first cola soft drink in the West. Coca-Cola no longer uses kola nuts in its recipe.

Photo by bruce_geisert on Flickr.

thefatoublog:

#theplace by SweetSalone. Visit www.stayattheplace.com

(via sabisierraleone)