DYNAMIC AFRICA

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Posts tagged "olympics"

Olympics: Why Africa fell by the wayside by Tolu Ogunlesi*

Extract:

Nigeria, an unrepentantly heavy trader in the stock market of optimism, went to London the way it likes to travel to global engagements (be they sporting events or climate change summits) — eschewing serious preparation, expecting the best, and inevitably attracting the worst, which actually varies in degree depending on the amount of good luck in the air.

In the end, the opening ceremony march-past turned out to be the high point of our London 2012 performance. From a tally of four medals in Beijing (1 silver and 3 bronze) we dropped into medal-less oblivion in London.

As with Nigeria, so has it been with Ghana (Ghana’s last Olympic medal was its Barcelona 1992 bronze in the men’s soccer event).

Kenya, with a much better Olympic record, has also disappointed in London. The east African country, 13th on the medals table four years ago, with a total of 14 medals, all in long-distance athletics (six of which were golds), dropped to 28th place in London, with 11 medals (only two of which were golds).

From the tales of woe filtering out from the various national camps one might be forgiven for assuming it’s the same set of officials managing the Nigerians, Ghanaians and the Kenyans.

Cameroon’s problems are of a slightly different nature — seven of its athletes vanished from camp two weeks into the Games, presumably envisaging brighter prospects as asylum-seekers than as home-bound Olympians.

*the article has more to do with Nigeria than Africa as a whole, imho.

kidduong:

Stephen Kiprotich Wins The Olympic’s Men’s Marathon.

Time:2:08:01

To help give some more perspective to this:

1) this is an average speed of 12.25 miles/hour (19.7 km/hour)

2) The average human long distance running speed is 5-8 miles/hour (8-13 kM/hour)

3) the average human sprinting speed is 12-18 miles/hour (19-29 km/hour)

4) A fast walking pace is about 3 miles/hour (5 km/hour)

That’s right, this guy literally ran at a sprinting pace for 26 miles. Think about that next time you’re huffing from trying to make it to the elevator before the door closes.

puterTDI

Another way to think of it is Stephen was running faster than the maximum of most treadmills for TWENTY-SIX MILES!

Woodsyyy

Ethiopia's Meseret Defar celebrates her win in the 5000-meter final during the athletics in the Olympic Stadium at the 2012 Summer Olympics, London, Friday, Aug. 10, 2012.

(x)

Kenyan athletes and medal winners David Rudisha (gold) and Timothy Kitum (bronze) pose and embrace after their victories in the men’s 800m race.

Kenyan winner of the 3000m men’s steeplchase race, Ezekiel Kemboi, gives us one of the most iconic moments of the Olympics thus far.

Abdalaati Iguider of Morocco came in third in the men’s 1500m final to claim the bronze medal - congratulations Morocco!

Algerian runner Taoufik Makhloufi just ran the 1500m finishing in first place to claim gold - congratulations Algeria!

Another victory for #Ethiopia today as Tika Gelana wins gold in the women’s marathon, running through the rainy streets of London, and setting a new Olympic record of 2 hours 23 minutes 7 seconds.

Priscah Jeptoo of Kenya came in second with a time of 2:23:12.

Four-time Olympian Roland Schoeman celebrated a personal victory after he finished sixth in the final of the men’s 50m freestyle at the London Olympics, despite having no financial support from South Africa, he said.

Schoeman, one of South Africa’s most decorated swimmers, launched an attack against the government and the SA Olympic body for their lack of support.

“I would have loved to have been faster,” Schoeman said.

“But not to have been funded at all for the last year-and-a-half by the South African government, not by Sascoc (SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee), not by anybody.

“To come and be placed sixth in the world after everybody had written me off. I’ll take that.”

As one of the country’s most successful Olympians, he won the bronze medal in the 50m freestyle, a silver in the 100m freestyle, and the gold medal with the 4x100m freestyle relay team at the Athens Games in 2004.

However, he said his result could have been more favourable had he received the same amount of support as London Olympic medallists, Chad le Clos and Cameron van der Burgh.

The 20-year-old Le Clos won a gold medal in the 200m butterfly and a silver in the 100m butterfly, while Van der Burgh clinched gold in the 100m breaststroke.

“A medal would have been tip-top if I had received the R50 000

odd Cameron has been receiving a month, same as Chad, where could I have been?” he said.

“I’ve gone like I said unfunded, I’ve had no massages, I’ve been living off my savings and I’ll take it at this point.”

The 32-year-old Schoeman said he did not know what his long term plans were and he would focus on the upcoming SA short course championships.

“We have SA short course championships in a couple of weeks so I am excited for that,” he said.

“I’ll go do a bit of racing there and hopefully get some funding heading into the world cups and do some world cups and hopefully get some money.”

He said he was satisfied with his progress over the last year and would continue his training in the United States.

“I was 22.40 at the world champs last year and I am 21.8 here,” Schoeman said.

“The States just works for me, South Africa has worked well for Cameron and Chad.”

Schoeman said he had tried to base his training in South Africa with little progress and he was happy with his program in Arizona.

“I tried to come back to South Africa in 2008 and it was just a huge steady decline from there,” he said.

“I love the mentality there (United States), I love the way my training is catered for.

“That’s what works and I have to stick with it.” – Sapa

Rwanda’s debutant Olympian Robert Kajuga set a personal best time of 27:56.67 to finish 14th in the London Olympics 10,000m men’s final last night at the Olympic Stadium.
The 27-year old, who went into the competition with a best time of 28:03:24 made the most drastic improvement of his career, setting an impressive time in one of the most closely contested race ever.
Somali-born Mo Farah became the first Briton to win Olympic 10,000m gold with a tremendous victory in the Olympic Stadium. The 29-year-old won in a time of 27 minutes, 30.42 seconds.
Farah’s triumph ended a run of four successive Ethiopian wins and stopped Kenenisa Bekele from winning a third consecutive title.
Galen Rupp of the United States finished second, while Ethiopia’s Tariku Bekele finished third. The two-time champion finished fourth, behind his young brother.
The gold is Farah’s first Olympic medal in his second Games - four years ago in Beijing, he failed to qualify for the 5,000m final.
(read more)

Rwanda’s debutant Olympian Robert Kajuga set a personal best time of 27:56.67 to finish 14th in the London Olympics 10,000m men’s final last night at the Olympic Stadium.

The 27-year old, who went into the competition with a best time of 28:03:24 made the most drastic improvement of his career, setting an impressive time in one of the most closely contested race ever.

Somali-born Mo Farah became the first Briton to win Olympic 10,000m gold with a tremendous victory in the Olympic Stadium. The 29-year-old won in a time of 27 minutes, 30.42 seconds.

Farah’s triumph ended a run of four successive Ethiopian wins and stopped Kenenisa Bekele from winning a third consecutive title.

Galen Rupp of the United States finished second, while Ethiopia’s Tariku Bekele finished third. The two-time champion finished fourth, behind his young brother.

The gold is Farah’s first Olympic medal in his second Games - four years ago in Beijing, he failed to qualify for the 5,000m final.

(read more)

Egypt’s Eman Gaber watches from the side of the piste during her side’s match against Great Britain at the London 2012 Olympic Games Women’s Foil Team Fencing event at the ExCel Centre, London, Great Britain,  August 2, 2012.

Djibouti's Abdourahman Osman reacts after he competed in the men's 50m freestlye heats swimming event at the London 2012 Olympic Games on August 2, 2012 in London.

Osman failed to qualify past the heat stage with a time of 27.25.

Cameroon’s Thomas Essomba, left, fights Morocco’s Abdelali Daraa in a men’s light flyweight (49 kg) round-of-32 boxing match during the London 2012 Olympic Games on July 31, 2012.

Despite winning this match, Essomba was later beaten by Ireland’s Paddy Barnes, 15-10.

Djibouti’s Yasmin Hassan Farah represented her country at this year’s Olympic games in the women’s singles table tennis event.

Farah was beaten 4-0 in the preliminary round by Brasil’s Caroline Kumahara.

Nigerian weightlifter, Felix Ekpo, has broken the Africa and Commonwealth Games records in the 77 kg category.

Ekpo achieved this feat in the on-going London 2012 Olympic Games when he lifted 151 kg (snatch) and 180 kg (Clean and Jerk), making his total score 311kg.

His performance at the snatch category is the best yet at Africa and Commonwealth levels. The previous Commonwealth record belongs to Peter Yukio of Nauru.

After finishing second in his Group ‘B’, Ekpo was adjudged 8th in the final standing as the first to sixth lifters of the ‘A’ category relegated the Nigerian lifter outside the podium.

Minister of Sports and Chairman of the NSC, Mallam Bolaji Abdullahi, was however impressed with Ekpo’s performance even though he did not win a medal.

(source)