DYNAMIC AFRICA

Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is a rich content-driven creative space with a Pan-African outlook established as an expressive platform for African experiences, African culture and African stories.


Dynamic Africa is a diverse multimedia platform, which curates global ideas, memes, attitudes and other phenomena that shape popular culture, with both a local and global African perspective.




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Posts tagged "okayafrica"

Wangechi Mutu On Making a Music Video for Pegasus Warning via @OkayAfrica

Wangechi Mutu: Much of the mood and imagery for Pegasus Warning’s was first and foremost inspired by this gorgeous, heart-achingly, multilayered and thoughtful lyrics and of course the music of this song “Try So Hard.”

The images that came to mind were those of Rodin’s sculptures.

Our set was built to reference cast bronze and two large pedestals were made for the actors. I wanted to harness the raw power and weight of Rodin’s erotic figures.

There is an incredible amount of movement in his sculptures because of his expressive style and the intense gestures and straining musculature of his forms. I wanted to see what it would be like for those figures to actually move around the room.

(cont. reading)

OkayAfrica assists US musician Flying Lotus in discovering his African ancestry through his maternal lineage (matrilineality) and tracks down 1/16th of his heritage to the Tikar people of Northwest Cameroon, who emigrated there from Sudan. 

In this feature, DJ Chief Boima introduces Flying Lotus to some popular Cameroonian songs that were all sampled by artists from the West including James Brown, Michael Jackson and Shakira - all of which used these songs without permission from the original artists. 

Previously on this blog I highlighted the Michael Jackson/Manu Dibangu ‘Soul Makossa’ copyright issues as well as that concerning Colombian artist Shakira and the use of the song ‘Zangalewa’. 

Find more posts on Cameroon.

@OkayAfrica presents “AFRICA IN YOUR EARBUDS #25”: JAKOBSNAKE

JakobSnake‘s a man of many trades: producer, Spoek Mathambo drummer, rapper in Cape Town’s Voicetag , DJ for BTEAM and organizer of the Cape Town Electronic Music Festival. Like his projects, JakobSnake’s selections in Africa In Your Earbuds #25 hover closely to the Cape Town scene; his mixtape features electronic bliss from Jumping Back Slash, Richard The Third, Ruffest and others.

“This mix is an extension of a series of parties I started called AfroClap!” writes JakobSnake via e-mail, “A platform to expose Tropical, African and South African culture to a market who love it, but who also are inundated with sounds from the rest of the world.” Stream/grab AIYE #25: JakobSnake below!

Shouts out to Underdog for the cover art.

TRACKLIST
1. JUMPING BACK SLASH – TRANSMISSIONS (SA)
2. TWA – AMALIZA (RWANDA)
3. RICHARD THE THIRD – UNFORTUNATE FOOL ft. NONKU PHIRI (SA)
4. FELIX LABAND – DIRTY NIGHTGOWN (SA)
5. JOHNNY CLEGG & JULUKA – SCATTERLINGS OF AFRICA (SA)
6. BIG SPACE – OPEN BAR (SA)
7. IDIOTPROOF & EATS EVERYTHING – ZULU (UK)
8. ATJAZZ & JULIAN GOMES – OVERSHADOWED (UK / SA)
9. TERRENCE PEARCE – MAJIK (SA)
10. MIA DORA – FRECKLES (UK)
11. DJ MZI – JAIVA (SA)
12. DJ WHAT WHAT – ROUND & ROUND ft. MATHABO (SA)
13. DJ ZINHLE – MY NAME IS (SA)
14. LVOVO – INAMANDLA (SA)
15. SCRATCHA DVA – JAMBAZZRUFFMIX3 (UK)
16. DJ FRESCA, BLACK MOTION & TUNA – AMAPHOYISA (SA)
17. RICHARD THE THIRD – UFUNANI ft. RUFFEST (SA)
18. HOSTAGE – VERSATILE SOUND (UK)
19. MJ COLE – TGV (UK)
20. LUBA KASAI – LUMPUNGU (CONGO)

On August 11th, Kigali became the first city in Africa to hold the esteemed Le Diner En Blanc party that started 20 years ago in Paris. The event in Kigali was hosted by our folks at  Illume Creative Studio and Events Africa. Guests dressed in all white as they wined and dined under the stars. The address of the venue remained a secret until night of the event when they met up in six of the different locations and were driven via bus.

Although the event is a European import, Illume seems to have crafted the night with Rwanda’s best interests in mind. Joan Mazimhaka says,

“One of Illume’s goals is to change what the world sees when you Google Rwanda, and we hope this is one of the  events that will accomplish that. We also wanted to put together a fun event for Kigali’s residents, regional guests and tourists and also put Kigali on the map as an events destination.”

The Diner En Blanc was deemed a fun night by all attendees and we hope to see more in different cities throughout Africa!

Check out more photos from the gorgeous dinner here.

Visit their Facebook page here.

(via okayafrica)

Selection of some of my favourite items at the OkayAfrica store, including the newly available ‘Africa Cuts' tee.

@OkayAfrica interviews filmmaker Andrew Dosunmu, the man behind the critically acclaimed ‘Restless City’, to uncover his inspiration behind the film as well as the movie making experience.

Excerpt:

BLR: Do you find it challenging working between Africa and the US?

AD: We live in a world that is global, so I don’t think there is any point in setting up rigid categorizations that wall people off from one another instead of building connections. I am working as an African in the Diaspora, and I try to make this relevant to the audience. It’s a comfort zone for me, a space full of possibilities rather than difficulties.

BLR: What is the role of music in your film?

AD: The music was important from the word go. We organize the movie in a couple of weeks, and one central element around which we built the narrative was this nomadic aspect of our male protagonist. I had in mind the idea of the cattlemen who uses music to keep the sheep moving, so I used music in the same way. Music also works as a middle passage, and that is the reason I used a lot of different songs from different musical traditions, to underline this transatlantic connection and tension through the soundtrack. Being from Africa, we are exposed to music from countless regions and traditions, so the protagonist’s being a musician was central to this project.

- DynamicAfrica

AFRICA IN YOUR EARBUDS #16: PETITE NOIR via @OkayAfrica 

Petite Noir is a South African/Congolese drone producer who also puts in time as the lead singer of Cape Town’s Popskarr and member of The Capital of Cool collective. He self-dubbed his musical style noir wave — “a take on post-punk/new wave with a hint of an African aesthetic.”

For our latest Africa In Your Earbuds, Petite Noir serves up a vibrant 56-minute South African house-tinged mix featuring Spoek Mathambo‘s remix of Seun KutiDJ Sbu and Zahara‘s “Lengoma”Alec Lomami and more. Explaining his selections, he states:

The reason my mix is predominantly South African is because it comes from a place that basically raised me. Coming to South Africa from Beligium, always having North African music playing and always listening to what my parents listened to, it somehow had some sort of relevance and made sense to me. I’m all for vernacular music, even though I might not understand what they are saying most of the time. I always use SA music as one of my influences.

Big up to Underdog for the cover artwork!

TRACKLIST
1. Sepulcure – The One (UK)
2. Dj Kent ft. Maleh – Falling (SA)
3.Big Nuz – Umlilo (SA)
4. Dj Clock Feat. Shisaboi – Ngomso (SA)
5. Fali feat. Olivia – Chaise Electric (DRC)
6. Alec Lomami – POP (DRC/USA)
7. DJ Sbu feat. Zahara – Lengoma (Petite Noir Chopped and screwed edit) (SA)
8. Flava – Sawa Le (NGA)
9. Fela Kuti – Water No Get No Enemy (NGA)
10. Amadou & Mariam – Dougou Badia Feat. Santigold (MLI/USA)
11. Petite Noir – ’till we ghosts/The Dance (DRC/ANG/SA)
12. Seun Kuti – The Good Leaf (Spoek Mathambo Remix) (NGA/SA)

@Okayafrica TV: Tinariwen And The Fight For Freedom

Note: The situation in Mali, to put it colloquially, is a mess. To be real: the depth and complexity of the conflict supersedes our ability to summarize it with the nuance it deserves. Below is our humble attempt, but for a clear and thoughtful explanation of the issues, check out Gregory Mann‘s piece in Foreign Policy.

A military coup last month, led by mid-level army officers, interrupted what would have been regularly scheduled, democratic presidential elections; the president at the time of the coup, Amadou Toumani Touré, was stepping down on April 29, 2012, barely a month away.  The military junta, which now calls itself the National Committee for the Restoration of Democracy and State (CNRDR),  was unhappy with the sitting presidentbecause of mismanaging the 2012 Tuareg Rebellion  – a continuation of a conflict dating back to 1916 between the Tuareg people and the Malian government – which led to demoralizing military defeats in the North of Mali.

Ironically however, the destabilization caused by the coup allowed for several rebel factions to take over parts of northern Mali, an area that has now been declared by the rebels as the sovereign state of Azawad (although this hasn’t been recognized by the international community). Whether or not a Tuareg free-state in the north is good or bad, the fear is that the general unrest has helped radical Islamist groups, such as Ansar Dine, establish a foothold in Mali. The coup lasted only three weeks because economic sanctions on Mali by ECOWAS (Economic Community of West African States) forced the reigning military to secede power to an interim government. However, the coup damage has been done, and for the time being Mali has been split into two parts.

Following the coup d’etat in Mali, the well-known Tuareg band Tinariwen publicly voiced their support in favor of the uprising in the North. Tinariwen bassist Eyadou Ag Leche‘s comments to Belgian public broadcaster VRT supporting the drive for a Tuareg state in Northern Mali, a reflection what he told Okayafrica TV a few months back, just after  Muammar Gaddafi was killed in Libya. Leche expresses an “appreciation” for Gaddafi and all that he provided for the nomadic Tuaregs during periods of drought for example, but admits that Tuaregs didn’t have full knowledge of Gaddafi’s brutal dictatorship in Libya. Above, Ag Leche explains a side of the conflict not often represented in Western media.

Video shot by Jay Sprogell, French translation by Siddhartha Mitter.