DYNAMIC AFRICA

Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is diverse multi-media curated blog with a Pan-African outlook that seeks to create an expressive platform for African experiences, stories and African cultures.



CONTACT: dynamicafricablog@gmail.com

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MORNING SONG: Burna Boy ft Davido - Trumpet

GIDI UP EPISODE 5: Beautiful Sweetness

Catch up on previous episodes of Gidi Up here.

EVENING TUNE: Nigerian soul singer Waje has officially dropped the sultry music video for her song ‘I Wish’.

EVENT: Asa, D’Angelo for Calabar Jazz Festival

Cross River’s biggest brand is the month-long Calabar Festival that dovetails into the internationally acclaimed Calabar Carnival, which holds every December. The Easter weekend will, however, be a special one in the city as the debut jazz fiesta has been accordingly packaged.

Episode 3 of the brand new Nigerian-based web series Gidi Up that chronicles the lives of young creatives and professionals in Nigeria’s bustling mega-city, Lagos.

Catch up on Episode 1 & 2.

STYLE ICON: King Sunny Adé

All hail King Sunny Adé (born Sunday Adeniyi on September 22, 1946 in Ondo) - Nigerian king of Yoruba juju music, an Omoba of the Yoruba people, and part-time bubu wearer.

DYNAMIC AFRICANS: The Nigerian Nostalgia Project

Dedicated to finding and cataloging the visual history of the most populous country in Africa, the Nigerian Nostalgia Project (NNP) is a fascinating initiative that pieces together the photographic accounts - both colour and black and white - of Nigeria in days past, from the late 19th century to the 1980s.

Dynamic Africa chatted with the young Nigerian blogger behind the tumblr page of this project about the motivation and inspiration behind NNP.

Before we get into what the NNP is all about, we’d like to get to know who’s behind the blog. Tell us a little about yourself:

My name is Olayemi, 20 years of age, born and raised in Lagos but moved to the States about 6 years ago.

What inspired you to start this blog and how long have you been running it?

My first inspiration came from seeing photos of my parents in their youth and seeing how happy they looked in “old” Nigeria.

Nigeria pre- and post-Independence was a proud nation of diverse people who were recognized throughout Africa and the rest of the world as such. During these times, great hope existed concerning the country’s future development. As such, my inspiration comes from wanting to revisit the details of Nigeria’s fragmented history, so I started this blog (on tumblr) in December 2012.

What is the purpose/objective of this blog? What do you hope readers will get from/after viewing your blog?

For me, the purpose of this blog is simply to learn more about my history. Collectively, there is constant negativity that surrounds Nigeria and Africa as a whole, so the objective of this blog is to show Nigeria’s true beauty and richness in culture both in the past and at this very moment. And who doesn’t like to see old pictures of their beloved country? Haha.

Since starting this blog, what has kept you motivated and/or what new things have you learned along the way?

My motivation comes from the positive feedback I’ve gotten from Nigerians, other Africans and people in general.

Why is the Nigerian Nostalgia Project so important to you and where do you obtain most of your material from?

This project is important to me because it is a basis for my national pride. A lot of Nigeria’s history is not documented, so these pictures are part of the available mediums where one can track the growth of what Nigeria has become today.

I’m only part of the admin on the original Facebook site. I volunteered to take up this tumblr page as a method of reaching an even larger audience. All the pictures come from there and other sites like the Delcampe.net. To visit and subscribe to the page click here.

What do you enjoy most about blogging on tumblr and what do you want most for people to take away from your blog?

I enjoy reading people’s responses to the photos, and I especially enjoy people telling me how their parent’s faces glowed with pride when they were shown this page.

I only want people to take away the fact that Nigeria and Africa as a whole is not inhabited by savages nor are we poverty stricken or disease ridden as the media often portrays us.

Where else can you be found on the internet?

Many thanks to Olayemi of NNP!

QUACKS is a hilariously accurate short comedic socio-political satire film by Nigerian filmmaker Abba Makama that revolves around “an elite group of pseudo intellectual leftists” that have convened for an emergency meeting to address the ineffective protests of the “have-nots” of a fictional state called ‘The Repulic’, that aims to “overthrow the existing regime ran by a cabal of self-centered materialists?”.

Will they succeed?

The film touches on the disconnect between the out of touch young elite of the society, and those whose everyday lives and realities that they are estranged from.

A must-watch.

 

Olamide - First Of All

THIS TRAAAAAAAAAAAAAAACK! Haha.

Solid Naija jam.


February 2013 will mark the first time Social Media Week takes place on the continent of Africa! Social Media Week Lagos brings together thought leaders, creatives, entrepreneurs and everyday citizens from Nigeria -and throughout the continent and the diaspora- to explore how people and organizations are connecting to share new ideas and information.
Get Involved today, Register now for social media week, Lagos http://socialmediaweek.org/

(via TechAfrica)

February 2013 will mark the first time Social Media Week takes place on the continent of Africa! Social Media Week Lagos brings together thought leaders, creatives, entrepreneurs and everyday citizens from Nigeria -and throughout the continent and the diaspora- to explore how people and organizations are connecting to share new ideas and information.

Get Involved today, Register now for social media week, Lagos http://socialmediaweek.org/

(via TechAfrica)

Serious collaboration between unstoppable hit-making duo P-Square and equally as successful US-Senegalese music maker Akon. The hook of this song are lines I long to hear.

Latest Sesan directed music video from G.O.O.D. Music-signed Nigerian artist D’Banj for his single ‘Bachelor’, shot in Atlanta, Georgia.

A Ju-Ju oracle man, and priest to the ‘God of Iron,’ in a village close to Benin City. 1982.

It has often been said that my generation was a very lucky one. And I agree. My luck was actually quite extraordinary. And it began quite early.

The pace of change in Nigeria from the 1940s was incredible. I am not just talking about the rate of development, with villages transforming into towns, or the coming of modern comforts, such as electricity or running water or modes of transportation, but more of a sense that we were standing figuratively and literally at the dawn of a new era.

My generation was summoned, as it were, to bear witness to two remarkable transitions—the first the aforementioned impressive economic, social, and political transformation of Nigeria into a midrange country, at least by third world standards. But, more profoundly, barely two decades later we were thrust into the throes of perhaps Nigeria’s greatest twentieth-century moment—our elevation from a colonized country to an independent nation.

An excerpt from Nigerian award-winning author Chinua Achebe's long-awaited soon to be released memoir, There Was A Country: A Personal History of Biafra.

Read more.