DYNAMIC AFRICA

Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is a rich content-driven creative space with a Pan-African outlook established as an expressive platform for African experiences, African culture and African stories.


Dynamic Africa is a diverse multimedia platform, which curates global ideas, memes, attitudes and other phenomena that shape popular culture, with both a local and global African perspective.




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Posts tagged "mother's day"

Five African Films that Highlight Mothers (and Mother Figures).

SARAFINA!

There are not one but two women in this film that are wonderful mother figures. The first, and most prominent in the film, is Whoopi Goldberg’s character. An inspiring woman from the moment we meet her, Mary Masombuka is not only a teacher, but a woman who’s vision of black liberation in apartheid South Africa propels her to defy racist and brutal authorities. Where Masombuka lacks the vigor of youth, Sarafina fills in and fulfills the dreams that cannot be contained to the four walls of their classroom. But let’s not forget Sarafina’s real mother played by the unforgettable Miriam Makeba. Although in this part of the film we see Sarafina almost mocking her mother’s complacency as a domestic worker, we know that Sarafina sees beyond their circumstances to understand the sacrificial nature of this relationship.

YESTERDAY

Dedicated wife, mother and friend, Yesterday (played by Leleti Khumalo) is a hard-working young woman living in the Zululand village of Rooihook whose life takes a sudden turn for the worst when she discovers that she’s infected with HIV/AIDS. As she confronts her husband, a migrant labourer working in the mines, his violent reaction and rejection of her and her young daughter, Beauty, shocks Yesterday but also makes her more dedicated to ensure that Beauty receives an education and is taken care of when Yesterday is no longer around.

MADAME BROUETTE

A single mother who divorced her abusive husband, Mati (Rokhaya Niang) toils daily by selling various goods at a nearby market, which she transports there via a large wheelbarrow — prompting local residents to dub her “Madame Brouette.”

DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST

Perhaps one of the most cinematically beautiful films ever made, this diaspora film by directer Julie Dash is full of women of various generations who are more than inspiring in their own right.

FARAW, MOTHER OF THE DUNES

Dedicated to the mother of the film director, Faraw tells the story of Zamiatou - a woman who more than fulfills her role as a dutiful wife and mother for her Sahelian family. It’s a difficult and burdensome life for her and, tired of seeing her mother suffer, Zamiatou’s daughter Hareyrata offers to work as a maid for rich French tourists, but her mother refuses. However, it’s not long before Zamiatou has to find a job of her own to support her family.

HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY: Prince Nico Mbarga - Sweet Mother

Nigerian model Oluchi Onweagba and her son Ugo in a 2008 photoshoot for Vogue (US)

#Ethiopian supermodel Liya Kebede with her husband Kassy Kebede, their son Suhul, and daughter Raee in an editorial shoot for Vogue magazine entitled ‘Across The Aisle’.

MOTHER’S DAY VIEWING: "African Booty Scratcher" - A short film by Nikyatu Jusu

A coming of age story, told through the lens of a young girl’s upcoming high school prom, that deals with the friction and conflicts that arise between one’s traditional roots and newfound cultural identity - a familiar battle amongst those living in the diaspora. 

In Jusu’s short film, we meet Isatu, a young girl forced to reassess her alliances between her mother’s traditional West African values and the American idealism that surrounds her.


Street art on a building on Dunga Road, Nairobi, featuring the late and great ‘Mama Africa’ - Miriam Makeba

May 2012

Ph: dailystruggle

BOOK: Mother is Gold: A Study in West African Literature by Adrian Roscoe

How did West African literature in English begin? What influences affected its birth and development? How much does it imitate European models? How is traditional African culture influencing modern writing? What kind of experiments are being tried? 
These are some of the questions, relevant to African writing throughout the continent, which this critical study discusses by examining the most significant work in verse, prose, drama, children’s literature, journalism and political writing in West Africa. 
The author examines the writing of major figures such as Soyinka, Achebe, Okara, Clark, Tutuola and Ekwensi as well as that of authors whose work is not as widely known.

BOOK: Mother is Gold: A Study in West African Literature by Adrian Roscoe

How did West African literature in English begin? What influences affected its birth and development? How much does it imitate European models? How is traditional African culture influencing modern writing? What kind of experiments are being tried?

These are some of the questions, relevant to African writing throughout the continent, which this critical study discusses by examining the most significant work in verse, prose, drama, children’s literature, journalism and political writing in West Africa.

The author examines the writing of major figures such as Soyinka, Achebe, Okara, Clark, Tutuola and Ekwensi as well as that of authors whose work is not as widely known.

Mimmo - Muciari

A song for mothers.

legrandcirque:

An old woman holding a baby.
Photograph by Nat Farbman.
Botswana, 1947.

legrandcirque:

An old woman holding a baby.

Photograph by Nat Farbman.

Botswana, 1947.

(via epeba)

legrandcirque:

A Madi woman carrying her baby on her back.

Photograph by Eliot Elisofon.

Uganda, 1947.

(via epeba)

fyeahafrica:

Vintage photograph of a Fulani woman with a baby on her back.

via vintageafrica

(via epeba)

(via epeba)

BOOK: Umama: South African Mothers and Grandmothers

Forty great South Africans celebrate their mothers and grandmothers. Leaders from the worlds of politics, business, music, sport, education and literature pay homage to the women who have influenced and inspired them to lead exceptional lives.

BOOK: Umama: South African Mothers and Grandmothers

Forty great South Africans celebrate their mothers and grandmothers. Leaders from the worlds of politics, business, music, sport, education and literature pay homage to the women who have influenced and inspired them to lead exceptional lives.

BOOK: Mother Is Gold, Father Is Glass: Gender and Colonialism in a Yoruba Town by Lorelle D. Smelley

Lorelle D. Semley explores the historical and political meanings of motherhood in West Africa and beyond, showing that the roles of women were far more complicated than previously thought. While in Kétu, Bénin, Semley discovered that women were treasurers, advisors, ritual specialists, and colonial agents in addition to their more familiar roles as queens, wives, and sisters. These women with special influence made it difficult for the French and others to enforce an ideal of subordinate women. As she traces how women gained prominence, Semley makes clear why powerful mother figures still exist in the symbols and rituals of everyday practices.

BOOK: Mother Is Gold, Father Is Glass: Gender and Colonialism in a Yoruba Town by Lorelle D. Smelley

Lorelle D. Semley explores the historical and political meanings of motherhood in West Africa and beyond, showing that the roles of women were far more complicated than previously thought. While in Kétu, Bénin, Semley discovered that women were treasurers, advisors, ritual specialists, and colonial agents in addition to their more familiar roles as queens, wives, and sisters. These women with special influence made it difficult for the French and others to enforce an ideal of subordinate women. As she traces how women gained prominence, Semley makes clear why powerful mother figures still exist in the symbols and rituals of everyday practices.

A mother with her child on her back is able to move around easier thanks to the Bicycling Empowerment Centre program that sets up bicycle making and repair shops in Namibia to both create employment, as well as establish shops where locals can easily buy bicycles at affordable prices and have them repaired at low costs.

This affordable form of mobility also allows those living in remote areas to have better and faster access to essential resources that would otherwise be difficult to access.