DYNAMIC AFRICA

Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is a rich content-driven creative space with a Pan-African outlook established as an expressive platform for African experiences, African culture and African stories.


Dynamic Africa is a diverse multimedia platform, which curates global ideas, memes, attitudes and other phenomena that shape popular culture, with both a local and global African perspective.




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Posts tagged "madagascar"

iluvsouthernafrica:

Madagascar:

Portraits of Malagasy women of different ethnicities.  Names unknown.

Photos by: Frans Lanting

iluvsouthernafrica:

Madagascar:
An elderly Benzanozano man, c 1841
The Bezanozano are believed to be one of the earliest Malagasy ethnic groups to establish themselves in Madagascar, where they inhabit an inland area between the Betsimisaraka lowlands and the Merina highlands. Their name means “those of many small plaits” in reference to their traditional hairstyle, and like the Merina they practice famadihana (the reburial ceremony).
The Bezanozano speak a dialect of the Malagasy language, which is a branch of the Malayo-Polynesian language group derived from the Barito languages, spoken in southern Borneo.
Name, date and photographer unknown. Text edited from Wiki.

iluvsouthernafrica:

Madagascar:


An elderly Benzanozano man, c 1841

The Bezanozano are believed to be one of the earliest Malagasy ethnic groups to establish themselves in Madagascar, where they inhabit an inland area between the Betsimisaraka lowlands and the Merina highlands. Their name means “those of many small plaits” in reference to their traditional hairstyle, and like the Merina they practice famadihana (the reburial ceremony).

The Bezanozano speak a dialect of the Malagasy language, which is a branch of the Malayo-Polynesian language group derived from the Barito languages, spoken in southern Borneo.

Name, date and photographer unknown. Text edited from Wiki.

(via nocturnalphantasmagoria)

diasporicroots:

Queen Binao of the Sakalava kingdom, Diego Suarez (now Antsinarana) Madagascar; photo c. 1904; she reigned 1895-1927.

iluvsouthernafrica:

Madagascar:

A young Vezo woman in Tulear.  (Name unknown)

Photo by Ervin Skalamera

(via abstrackafricana)

lickystickypickyshe:

In July 1761 an illegal slave ship foundered near Tromelin, a speck of land 200 miles east of Madagascar. After six months on the island, the surviving gentlemen and sailors assembled a makeshift boat and departed, promising to return for the 60 slaves left on the island. They never did.

The slaves kept a fire going for 15 years while they struggled to survive on an island of barely 0.3 square miles. They fashioned houses from coral and sand, built a communal oven, and subsisted on turtles and seabirds.

“We have found evidence of where they lived and what they ate,” archaeologist Max Guérout told the Independent in 2007. “We have found copper cooking utensils, repaired, over and over again, which must originally have come from the wreck of the ship.”

Many of the castaways simply succumbed. At one point 18 left on a makeshift raft; it’s not known whether they reached land. In 1776 a French sailor was shipwrecked on the island, built a raft, and escaped to Mauritius with three men and three women. When a rescue ship arrived for the last seven castaways, they included a grandmother, her daughter, and an 8-month-old grandchild who had been born on the island.

The governor in Ile de France declared them free, since they had been bought illegally. He adopted the family of three and named the boy Jacques Moise. His surname is a French form of Moses — a baby rescued from water.

DYNAMIC AFRICANS: I Love Southern Africa

This blog first caught my attention perhaps a little over a month, or so, ago, and it’s safe to say it was love at first sight.

Dedicated to representing a total of 12 countries, from Angola to Zambia, Madagascar to Lesotho, the individual behind the blog manages to take it all in stride shedding essential knowledge on each country, posting incredibly thorough, diverse and in-depth content that’s is beyond enriching.

Having a thorough appreciation of this blog, and thus it’s curator, it seemed only right to feature them in this series of Dynamic Africans on tumblr. My interview only made me even more of a fan and I’m left even more inspired by the person behind I Love Southern Africa.

In about five sentences or less, can you tell us a little about yourself. Who is the person behind the blog?

I’m a young woman from two of the countries I blog about, currently starting a new chapter in my life after having taken care of family for a while (the African immigrant’s story!). 

What are the main objectives of your blog? What led or inspired you to create it?

My main objective was to shine a light on everything time can permit to blog on Southern Africa.  Outside of the countries themselves, not much is known or spoken of Southern Africa other than HIV/AIDS, Robert Mugabe, Malawi as it pertains to Madonna, Namibia as it pertains to Angelina Jolie and Madagascar as it pertains to the animated movie of the same name. 

Southern Africa is also known primarily for our animals but not the people around them, their history, dreams etc.  It’s a region with a very rich and intense history which influences the vibrant culture and life today. 

Since starting this blog, what has kept you motivated and/or what new things have you learned along the way?

I must admit I also didn’t know too much about the whole region and I feel like I am blogging for myself at times when I get excited about finding something I had never known. 

I am essentially motivated by my own ignorance about the area and my love for it as well. 

Other African diaspora blogs also inspire me to keep digging, sharing and finding what I would’ve never thought to look for.  I’m still stunned by the incredible history and roles played by everyone in shaping the region then and today. 

What do you love most about Southern Africa/being from Southern Africa, and in what ways are you able to connect with Africans from other regions?

Like all folks in the diaspora I love my people, culture, history, politics and self deprecating humour to name a few! I love watching us Southern Africans expand our Pan-Africaness (if there is such a term?) even though we are still unfortunately closed off from the rest of the diaspora in some ways. 

I always thought it would be politics that unite all Africans but I see how our current youth culture, specifically music brings everyone together.  I love reading comments under Youtube videos from people all across the diaspora showing love to a musician whose lyrics they don’t understand but they feel the music. 

I’ve been a wanna-be die-hard Pan Africanist since my early teens and I still fall in love with everything from the fashion from other regions to the literature and political heroes.  Oh and the food - I can finally make Egusi without following instructions on Youtube!

Being an African in the diaspora, what has been the most difficult and/or inspiring element of this experience for you? 

The most inspiring element has also been the most difficult:  Digging in the crates for photographs, books etc is worth every late night and eye bags. 

However, realizing how much of my own history I was never taught, how much of it exists in foreign institutions and not our own and how much of our history was recorded by others while our own methods of recording our history were forcibly wiped out, drove me to tears a few times.  

I’m reassured by current and past artists, musicians, writers, bloggers etc of the diaspora who have and continue to express our souls.

Lastly, where else can you be found online?

Twitter: @SouthRnAfrika - but I am rarely there.  Stuck on Tumblr!

 

A few examples of paper currency in Madagascar.

The ariary is the currency of Madagascar. It is subdivided into 5 iraimbilanja and is one of only two non-decimal currencies currently circulating.

The names ariary and iraimbilanja derive from the pre-colonial currency, with ariary being the name for a silver dollar. Iraimbilanja means literally “one iron weight” and was the name of an old coin worth ⅕ of an ariary.

The ariary was introduced in 1961. It was equal to 5 Malagasy francs. Coins and banknotes were issued denominated in both francs and ariary, with the sub-unit of the ariary, the iraimbilanja, worth ⅕ of an ariary and therefore equal to the franc. The ariary replaced the franc as the official currency of Madagascar on January 1, 2005.

Coins and banknotes were denominated in both the official francs and the semi-official ariary and iraimbilanja since 1961. On early issues, the franc denomination was the most prominent. However, from 1978, higher value coins were issued denominated only in ariary. In 1993, new 500 ariary-2500 franc note and 5000 ariary-25,000 franc were issued with ariary slightly more prominent.

On banknotes issued since July 31, 2003, the ariary denomination is displayed prominently and the franc denomination in small print. Lower denomination coins are also now issued denominated in ariary but with the main design unchanged.

A FEW FACTS ABOUT MADAGASCAR:

Location: The Republic of Madagascar (called Repoblikan’i Madagasikara in Malagasy) is an island country off the coast of southeastern Africa in the Indian Ocean (located about 500 km or 300 miles east of Mozambique).

Size: Madagascar is the fourth largest island in the world. It covers an area of 587,040 sq km (about 227,800 sq miles, smaller than the US state of Texas but bigger than California). Madagascar is about 1600 km (1,000 miles) long and 400 km (250 miles) wide.

Capital: Antananarivo is the capital of Madagascar and the largest city in Madagascar. The name Antananarivo means “The City of Thousands” (“arivo” means “thousand” in Malagasy). This high-altitude city was founded in the 1600s as a walled citadel. Antananarivo is located in the central highlands; its altitude is 1,468 meters above sea level. Madagascar.

Provinces: Madagascar is divided into six provinces (called faritany); Antananarivo (the capital), Antsiranana (North), Fianarantsoa, Mahajanga (a mostly uninhabited area on the west coast), Toamasina, and Toliara.

Population: People first traveled to Madagascar in boats from continental Africa about 2,000 years ago. The people of Madagascar today are a mixture of Asian (Austronesian) and African, with some people from the Middle East. The population of Madagascar is about 18,040,341 (estimated in July 2005). An inhabitant of Madagascar is called a Malagasy.

Ethnic Groups: Madagascar is home to many African/Asian ethnic groups, including: Malayo-Indonesian (Merina and related Betsileo), Cotiers (mixed African, Malayo-Indonesian, and Arab ancestry - Betsimisaraka, Tsimihety, Antaisaka, Sakalava), French, Indian, Creole, and Comoran.

Major Languages: French and Malagasy are the official languages of Madagascar.

Flag: The Malagasy flag is has a white vertical band by the flagpole and red and green horizontal bands (the red band is on top). Each color field has the same area; the total height-to-width ratio of the flag is 2:3. This flag was officially adopted on October 14, 1958.

Money: The unit of money in Madagascar is the Malagasy franc. Madagascar is one of the few countries in the world that doesn’t use a decimal currency (the only other country is Mauritania). The Malagasy currency uses a base 5 system (1 ariary = 5 Malagasy francs).

Natural Resources: Madagascar has gold, phosphates, kaolin, salt, limestone, uranium, and hydropower (water-powered electricity). Most of the people in Madagascar (about 70-80 percent) make their living by farming and fishing; about 10 percent of the population is nomadic.

Geography: Madagascar is a mountainous island with some high plateaus (high-altitude flat areas); it is ringed by a narrow coastal plain (a flat area). Madagascar has rainforests that are home to many unusual animals. Nosy means “island” in the Malagasy language.

Plants: This isolated island is home to many unusual plants including huge palms, 8 species of baobab trees, and many orchids. The national tree of Madagascar is the baobob tree.

(source)

Happy Independence Day to everyone from Madagascar!

The Republic of Madagascar was formed on June 26, 1960, after gaining independence from France. Madagascar was a colony of France from 1896 to 1960. On August 19, 1992, Madagascar’s constitution was adopted by a national vote.

Photographs taken all around Madagascar, in the 1990s and early 2000s, by Madagascar-born photographer Pierrot Men.

Henri Noyer (attr.), inscribed:
Taisaka Spearsmen No. 2
Madagascar, early twentieth century
Gelatin or collodion printed-out print

The Taisaka come from the South-East coast of the island of Madagascar.

iluvsouthernafrica:

Madagascar:

Beautiful Magadascan women: c. 1898

(the beauty and power of these women made me cry)

Felt the same way as I was scrolling through these photographs of these incredibly beautiful women. Their elaborate hairstyles and equally as immaculate clothing just blows me away.

(via bblackkblobb)

iluvsouthernafrica:

Madagascar:

Incredible images of beautiful Madagascan women, c. 1898


(Every morsel of discovering your history changes your life for the better imho.  The overwhelming beauty of these women is humbling and inspiring)

Vintage portrait of Betsileo children (Central Plateu)

Women braiding their hair in Antananarivo, Madagascar (c. 1907)