DYNAMIC AFRICA

African-based news, lifestyle & popular culture platform that brings you stories and information concerning Africa and the African diaspora. Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is a rich content-driven creative space with a Pan-African outlook established as an expressive platform for African experiences, African culture and African stories.


Dynamic Africa is a diverse multimedia platform, which curates global ideas, memes, attitudes and other phenomena that shape popular culture, with both a local and global African perspective.




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Posts tagged "jozi"

21 Icons photography exhibit opening June 16th at MOAD.

Mercedes-Benz presents ‘21 Icons – Portrait of a Nation’, opening at the Museum of African Design in the Maboneng Precinct on Youth Day, 16 June. The exhibition runs to 17 August and features the work of award-winning photographer Adrian Steirn who, for several years, has photographed some of South Africa’s most inspiring icons.

Based in Cape Town, Australian-born Steirn was inspired to create this project by the many people who have contributed to the success story that is South Africa today.

21 Icons South Africa celebrates the lives of 21 extraordinary South Africans who have captured the global imagination with their dignity, humanity, hard work and selfless struggle for a better world.

DYNAMIC AFRICANS: Cedric Nzaka of “Everyday People Stories”.

From the street to the runway, and back to the streets again, Cedric Nzaka is a man on a mission. Armed with nothing but his great eye and passion for style, fashion and culture, and his camera, of course, the Kenyan-born South African-based creative has been documenting everything from the faces of Jozi’s style-conscious youth to the runways of fashion weeks in South Africa.

Intrigued by his documentation of the monthly Johannesburg brunch series THE WKND SOCIAL, I caught up with the jack-of-many-creative-trades to find out more about the man behind Everyday People Stories.

In a few words, tell us a little bit about who you are and what you do. 

I’m Cedric Nzaka, Kenyan-born and raised, but currently based in South Africa. I’d describe myself as a humanitarian, social documentary and landscape photographer, with a particular interest in NGO photography, and with a keen detailed eye for urban and street wear photography. Most of all, to paraphrase Friedrich Nietzsche: “I’m an artist and no artist tolerates reality”.

It’s always so interesting to meet other foreign Africans in South Africa, and Johannesburg has become a magnet for many Africans from all over the continent and all walks of life in recent years. What brought you to South Africa? What’s it like being Kenyan in SA?

The main reason I came to South Africa was to discover a nation’s struggle for freedom whilst following the footsteps of Nelson Mandela, Hector Pieterson and many other celebrated revolutionaries. The South African freedom struggle is a compelling story that tells of the sacrifices made by the people in overcoming the oppression of colonialism and apartheid. 

Living away from your country can be a really interesting and unforgettable experience, but at the same time it has very important effects on one’s life. The major effect, and also a very common one, is that once you begin a life away from home, you find yourself missing everything from your past. This is not to say that you are unhappy, but rather that you are aware of your newfound solitude.

Missing your family and the attention they all paid to you is a very common feeling. Little details like sitting on a Sunday morning watching TV alone instead of helping your dad organizing his things or having a nice chat with your mom makes you realize how valuable your family really is. For me, being a Kenyan in SA has made it possible for me to achieve a certain kind of newfound knowledge. You learn how to accept being in another type of society and a foreign culture, as you’re now living in a place with different customs and traditions from yours. You have to be able to develop yourself in unknown conditions. This means making new friends, learning other points of view, accepting different opinions and values, and seizing every opportunity you have to go to new places. 

How long have you been involved in photography? Did you start out wanting to photograph fashion portraits or was there something else you had in mind when you began using a camera?

 I started out with documentary photography because I considered documentaries to be a powerful means of conveying social messages to the world. Many people use television and film as a form of entertainment and if one can add factual information to the mix, the medium of documentary films can produce great changes by creating awareness and simultaneously educating the masses.

But somewhere along the line while I was working on a travel documentary, I felt the urge to do something different and out of my conform zone. Something that would help me grow as an artist and as an individual, which led to me choosing to get involved in urban and street style photography.

You’ve photographed a range of different fashion scenes, from the street to the runway. Is there one particular environment you prefer over others?

Street Photography is art photography that features the human condition within public places and does not necessitate the presence of a street or even the urban environment. Truth be told, I do enjoy shooting on the runway as much as I enjoy working in the streets because it allows me to challenge myself as a photographer. But there is not that much that can be done when it comes to runway photography compared to street photography. To me, street photographs are mirror images of society, displaying “unmanipulated” scenes, with usually unaware/aware subjects. 

You’re someone who seems to be able to capture a certain kind of youth culture and soulful essence of what’s hip in Johannesburg. Where are your favourite places to photograph in Jozi? Can you tell us about some of your favourite hangout spots in Jo’burg?

One of my favourite places to photograph is Braamfontein Centre. It borders the city centre and is joined to Newtown by the Nelson Mandela Bridge. Braamfontein is fast becoming the hipster capital of Johannesburg as it’s home to a number of museums, theatres, restaurants and coffee shops, the Neighbourgoods Market - a Food and Design Market that’s open every Saturday, galleries and quirky design stores.

My second favourite place to photograph when in Jo’burg is definitely Maboneng which has been converted from industrial properties to a happening lifestyle playground. Street art is a big feature here, along with an eclectic selection shops. The pioneer development is Arts on Main and it’s also home to the Market on Main.

Third favourite place would be Newtown. Jo’burg’s original cultural precinct, Newtown is a vast heritage site with the impressively renovated Turbine Hall and immense Mary Fitzgerald square that hosts thousands of people for major cultural events.

My favourite hangout spots therefore would be anywhere around those three above-mentioned areas - from the famous Great Dane and Kitcheners in Braamfontein, all the way to Goethe on Main in Maboneng.

The Johannesburg street scene seems to be evolving from one great thing to the next. What are some of the trends you’ve noticed unfold in recent months?

Johannesburg is shedding its painful, crime-ridden past to emerge as Africa’s hippest hub for art, music and fashion. The fashion industry in Jo’burg is constantly growing - especially the design front of it all. The trends I’ve seen emerge a lot more are centered on the question of identity where most people communicate and express themselves through what they wear.

Besides photography, are there other things you’re involved in?

I’m a marketing consultant, graphic and fashion designer, fashion trend analyst, writer and illustrator. I’ve also had a passion for soccer from a very tender age and it’s something I still take part in when I’m not using my camera.

Lastly, what are five things you can’t leave the house without?

My iPhone, DSLR Camera + 50mm lens, clean pair of sneakers and most of all head gear. I’m always wearing some sort of head gear be it a beanie, snap back or 5 panel cap. I always have to have something on my head. 

Find him on Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter & Instagram.

On November 19th, 2013, the Steve Biko Foundation, in collaboration with YFM, will host the 11th session of the FrankTalk Radio Dialogues. This year’s talk will be focusing on the theme: Black Consciousness and Gender.

To RSVP and be part of the audience email Thando Sipuye at tsipuye@sbf.org.za.

More events.

Nelly’s Hair Salon

Johannesburg, South Africa

Taken by chomma

heritage1960:

Elle SA | “Jozi Maboneng” (January 2013)

Design from across the continent meets in Soweto, the melting pot that is a snapshot of Joburg life, to celebrate the true spirit of African fashion.”

Styling: Poppy Evans

Hair: Lesley Whitby

Photography: Ross Garrett

Make-Up: Kevin Epstein

Filmmaker Philip Bloom’s mini documentary on the history and cultural significance of Johannesburg iconic building, Ponte Tower, from two different perspectives.

This is the first of four videos in his series of films made in South Africa.

TW: Mention of accidental death.

Photographs taken by street style photographer Scott Schuman, better known as “The Sartorialist”, in Johannesburg, South Africa.

thesissocialjam:

#Jozi #Joburg #Traffic

(via darkgirlswirl)

VIDEO: STR.CRD 2012 | AREA3 Maboneng Precinct

STR CRD is the largest annual youth culture event in South Africa, focusing on fashion, art, music and street culture as a whole. This year was the third year of the event, held in The Maboneng Precinct, a new and exciting part of Johannesburg. This video shows of AREA3, adidas’ year long activation which you will be hearing about lots in the near future.

Brands that exhibited at the festival include: adidas, Nike, Two Bop, Super, Unknown Union, Converse, and many more. The Fesitival also included talks from some of the big names in street culture both locally and internationally, such as King Adz, Martha Cooper, Falko, and Ricky Lee Gordon.

I was in Johannesburg a few weeks ago for an incredibly short visit and on my way back to catch my flight, I decided to take the Gautrain from it’s Sandton stop to the O.R. Tambo Airport.

All in all, it was an incredibly smooth ride and wonderful experience. The station looks incredible, the train came on time and the ride was nothing short of pleasant. Highly recommended!

Hopefully Cape Town will be next!

Learn more about the Gautrain.

ROA has been busy working on his wall non-stop since being in the Maboneng Precinct for I ART JOBURG.

With six massive African animals completed in a short amount of time, we’d say he’s done a brilliant job of bringing some wildlife back into the city.

Martha Cooper snapped the below pictures of the mysterious street artist in action.

(via africaisdonesuffering)

EVENT: The Out in Africa South African Gay & Lesbian Film Festival is back in Jozi and Cape Town, happening from 19-28th October, 2012.

Images from the series "May Johannesburg Bless You" photo series by Banele Rewo