DYNAMIC AFRICA

Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is a rich content-driven creative space with a Pan-African outlook established as an expressive platform for African experiences, African culture and African stories.


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Posts tagged "independence"

Happy Independence Day Djibouti!

The Republic of Djibouti is a successor of French Somaliland. It was later referred to as the French territory of the Afars and Issas. The country was created in 19th century after French became interested in the Horn of Africa as a reaction growing British interests in Egypt. The first elections were held in the region on 23rd November 1958.

French President Charles de Gaulle visited Djibouti in August 1966 – it was met with 2 days of public demonstrations by Somalis who demanded independence. Louis Saget was appointed governor general of the region on 21st September 1966. He announced that the French government had decided to stage a referendum to see if the local people still wanted to be a part of the French Republic.

In the referendum held in March 1967 60 percent of the people decided to remain with France. In July 1967, as per an order from France, the name of the region was changed to French Territory of Afars and Issas. The administrative structure of the territory was changed as well by the directive.

In 1975 French government started to face growing and persistent demands for independence from Djibouti. In June 1976 the citizenship law of the region was modified to reflect the importance of Issa Somali. In a referendum in May 1977 the electorate voted in favor of independence. The Republic of Djibouti became a reality on 27th June 1977.

Happy Independence Day to everyone from Madagascar!

The Republic of Madagascar was formed on June 26, 1960, after gaining independence from France. Madagascar was a colony of France from 1896 to 1960. On August 19, 1992, Madagascar’s constitution was adopted by a national vote.

Happy Independence Day to all those from Somaliland!

18 May 1991

*Happy belated Independence day to Tanzania! (April 29th, 1961)

In 1954, Julius Nyerere, a school teacher who was then one of only two Tanganyikans educated to university level, organized a political party—the Tanganyika African National Union (TANU). On December 9, 1961, Tanganika became an autonomous Commonwealth realm, and Nyerere became Prime Minister, under a new constitution. On December 9, 1962, a republican constitution was implemented with Mwalimu Julius Kambarage Nyerere as Tanganyika’s first president.

Zanzibar received its independence from the United Kingdom on December 10, 1963, as a constitutional monarchy under the Sultan. On January 12, 1964, the African majority revolted against the sultan and a new government was formed with the ASP leader, Abeid Karume, as President of Zanzibar and Chairman of the Revolutionary Council.

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*correction! not independence, but merger day with Zanzibar.

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Happy Independence Day to Togo!

On 27 April 1960, in a smooth transition, Togo severed its constitutional ties with France, shed its UN trusteeship status, and became fully independent under a provisional constitution with Olympio as president.

A new constitution in 1961 established an executive president, elected for 7 years by universal suffrage and a weak National Assembly. The president was empowered to appoint ministers and dissolve the assembly, holding a monopoly of executive power. In elections that year, from which Grunitzky’s party was disqualified, Olympio’s party won 90% of the vote and all 51 National Assembly seats, and he became Togo’s first elected president.

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fuckyeaafricans:

Happy 52nd Independence day to Sierra Leone!!

(via sabisierraleone)

Happy Independence Day to all Zimbabweans everywhere!

Celebrating the country’s 33rd independence day today, April 18th, 2013, the country formerly colonized by the British in and known as Southern Rhodesia and later simply ‘Rhodesia’, after Cecil Rhodes, the southern African state gained independence in 1980. It had been a British colony since 1889.

At the independence day celebrations in April 1980, held in the capital Salisbury that would later be renamed as Harare in 1982, many foreign signatories were present including President of Botswana Seretse Khama, Zambian President Kenneth Kaunda, Nigerian President Shehu Shagari and Indian Prime Minister Indira Ghandi.

Bob Marley, invited by the government of Zimbabwe headed by President Canaan Banana and Robert Mugabe as Prime Minister, performed a song he’d written for the historic occasion called ‘Zimbabwe’.

President Shagari of Nigeria pledged $15 million at the celebration to train Zimbabweans in Zimbabwe and expatriates in Nigeria.

Explore the Zimbabwe tag on Dynamic Africa.

The Namibian War of Independence, which lasted from 1966 to 1988, was a guerrilla war which the nationalistSouth-West Africa People’s Organization (SWAPO) and others fought against the apartheid government of South Africa. It was closely intertwined with the South African Border War.

South Africa had administered what was then still known as South West Africa since it captured the German territory during World War I and subsequently received a League of Nations mandate to administer the territory. In 1966 the United Nations General Assembly, successor to the League of Nations, revoked South Africa’s mandate to govern South-West African territory and declared that it was under direct UN administration. South Africa refused to recognize this resolution and continued to administer the territory de facto.

On August 26, 1966, SWAPO guerilla forces launched an attack against the South African Defence Force at Omugulugwombashe. It was the first armed battle in the Namibian struggle for independence. In commemoration of the day, August 26 is a public holiday in Namibia. It is recognized by the United Nations as Namibia Day but Namibians refer to it as Heroes’ Day.

The war ended with the New York Accords signed on December 22, 1988, which also ended direct involvement of foreign troops in the Angolan Civil War. Independence came to Namibia on 21 March 1990 following elections which saw SWAPO win 55 of 72 seats in the National Assembly of Namibia, enabling them to form a national government.

Happy Independence Day to all Namibians!

271 plays

Dr. Kwame Nkrumah's Independence Day Speech.

Happy Independence Day Ghana!

On March 6th, 1957, Ghana became the first independent African country south of the Sahara with Osagyefo Dr. Kwame Nkrumah as its leader.

Happy Independence Day to all of our readers from The Gambia!

The Gambia became independent from British colonial rule on
18 February, 1965.

Happy Independence Day to all of readers from Tanzania!

December 9th, 1961.

The mainland of Tanzania became a German colony called Tanganyika in 1884 whilst the Sultanate of Zanzibar became a British Protectorate in 1890. Tanganyika became a British mandated territory in 1918 and achieved independence in 1961.

In 1963 Zanzibar achieved independence, and a year later formed a union with Tanganyika under the new name of Tanzania.

In 1954, Julius Nyerere, a school teacher who was then one of only two Tanganyikans educated to university level, organized a political party—the Tanganyika African National Union (TANU). On December 9, 1961, Tanganika became an autonomous Commonwealth realm, and Nyerere became Prime Minister, under a new constitution. On December 9, 1962, a republican constitution was implemented with Mwalimu Julius Kambarage Nyerere as Tanganyika’s first president.

Zanzibar received its independence from the United Kingdom on December 10, 1963, as a constitutional monarchy under the Sultan. On January 12, 1964, the African majority revolted against the sultan and a new government was formed with the ASP leader, Abeid Karume, as President of Zanzibar and Chairman of the Revolutionary Council.

In the first few days, between 5,000 and 15,000 Arabs and Asians were murdered, women were raped and their homes burned. Within a few weeks, a fifth of the population had died or fled.

It was at this time that the Tanganyika army revolted and Britain was asked by Julius Nyerere to send in troops. Royal Marines Commandos were sent by air from England via Nairobi and 40 Commando came ashore from the aircraft carrier HMS Bulwark. Several months were spent with Commandos touring the country disarming military outposts. When the successful operation ended, the Royal Marines left to be replaced by Canadian troops.

On April 26, 1964, Tanganyika united with Zanzibar to form the United Republic of Tanganyika and Zanzibar. The country was renamed the United Republic of Tanzania on October 29 of that year. The name Tanzania is a portmanteau of Tanganyika and Zanzibar and previously had no significance. Under the terms of this union, the Zanzibar Government retains considerable local autonomy.

(sources: 1; 2)

Happy Independence Day to all of our readers from Zambia!

Formally the British colony of Northern Rhodesia, Zambia was grouped with Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and Nyasaland (Malawi) as part of a federation in 1953. Independence from Britain was achieved on October 24, 1964 as part of the program to dilute the power of white racists in Southern Rhodesia.

Uganda is busy putting final touches on the country’s Golden Jubilee to be celebrated on Tuesday. As many as 15 heads of state are expected; the Kololo stadium, constructed for the occasion, is ready; at this very moment, Kampala is still being embellished. But not everyone in the country is sharing that party atmosphere.

Uganda is divided when it comes to its 50th anniversary as an independent nation. Opposition parties have already announced they will boycott the event. In the week prior to 9 October, several of their leaders, including the most prominent one, Kizza Besigye, have been arrested for defying the temporary ban on all anti-government demonstrations.

"What is there to celebrate?" asks Erin Nagaba, in her late twenties. "Our country has no jobs. I’ve been looking for employment for years, but I fail to find it. Now I help out my mother in her shop." Nagaba says she won’t go to town on Tuesday to celebrate. "I’d rather keep my shop open to earn the money we need to survive," she says. The country is struggling to cope with a population growth of 1.2 million people every year, causing a severe lack of schools, health centres and job opportunities.

Don’t trust appearances

Although Uganda’s economy grew at an estimated 4 percent last year, some say not everyone is benefiting from it.

"If you drive through Kampala you see new buildings coming up everywhere, so it looks as if we are developing a lot," says Hussein Kawalya, a driver and father of five. "But don’t be deceived. Most buildings are owned by the same people. One rich businessman can construct ten big buildings."

"Look at all those new supermarkets," he carries on. "Most of them are owned by Kenyans and South Africans. Ugandan companies are not flourishing." Kawalya says his financial situation is worse now than five years ago, due to inflation close to 30 percent that has plagued the country’s economy for the last year and a half.

(read more)

Preparing for independence day: Jets practising their fly-pasts over Kampala for the independence day and golden jubilee celebrations taking place on October 9th. (Photograph by Will Boase)