DYNAMIC AFRICA

African-based news, lifestyle & popular culture platform that brings you stories and information concerning Africa and the African diaspora. Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is a rich content-driven creative space with a Pan-African outlook established as an expressive platform for African experiences, African culture and African stories.


Dynamic Africa is a diverse multimedia platform, which curates global ideas, memes, attitudes and other phenomena that shape popular culture, with both a local and global African perspective.




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Posts tagged "imazighen"

Early 20th century photographs of Ouled Nail Imazighen (Berber) women from North Africa - mainly Algeria, but some sources also mention Tunisia.

These women were said to be professional belly dancers who earned a living by travelling from town to town, putting on performances that are said to have some times involved nudity.

Ornamented in distinctive jewelry and make up, some times also having facial tattoos, these women stood out from many other women in North Africa who, during this time, were often veiled in public at all times.

Further reading.

AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

la-cote-d-ivoire:

A Touareg (Imazighen) vendor on the shores of Assinie Beach, Cote d’Ivoire

la-cote-d-ivoire:

A Touareg (Imazighen) vendor on the shores of Assinie Beach, Cote d’Ivoire

(via abidjanaise)

DYNAMIC AFRICANS: Meet the young Moroccan, based in Belgium, whose blog, Kahina, highlights and celebrates the traditions, culture, aesthetics and history of the often marginalized Amazingh of North Africa.

Tell us a little about who is behind this blog:

I’m 15 years old, I study economics and languages. I’m a Moroccan Muslim, originally from the north-east close to the Algerian boarder. My parents emigrated in the seventies to Belgium like many other Moroccans searching for their luck in Europe. And I really love art.

What inspired you to start this blog and how long have you been running it?

At first I just had a blog without any exact purpose, I was mainly interested in other blogs. After a while, I realized there were not many blogs telling the stories the of the indigenous people of North Africa. I learned that many people think that the Amazigh culture is Arabic of Middle Eastern.

I also found that some people still have a false idea of the Amazigh people. They think for example that the Imazighen are a small group off people living in small villages in North Africa when in reality we are a large group of people living internationally.

And last but not least throughout my blog I try to show the richness of the Amazigh culture.

What is the meaning behind the name of your blog?

'Kahina' was an Amazigh queen and military leader. She led the Amazigh resistance against the Arabic expansion in Northwest Africa.

My url ‘Tamza-d-Amzew’ means female and male giant. Practically in every Amazigh story or legend there’s this giant scaring the people. They consist of many characteristics and interact with people.

Since starting this blog, what has kept you motivated and/or what new things have you learnt along the way?

Since I have this blog my interests in African culture has only continued to grow.

Your blog is dedicated to the history, culture, traditions and the identity of the Imazighen people - what is/are the most important facets of Imazighen traditions to you?

First of all I adore the old Amazigh stories my mother used to tell me when I was little, no Aladdin or little mermaid when I grew up :-)

The clothing and accessories truly fascinate me, I see this coming back in simple weddings of farmers in Morocco unlike the rich fancy wedding parties in the big cities.

I also feel proud to call myself Tamazight, and to be part of the Imazighen who have fought for their rights and freedom.

What do you enjoy most about blogging on tumblr?

I’m really interested in other bloggers showing their culture through similar mediums, and learning more through these blogs.

What do you want most for people to take away from your blog?

I hope people will look differently at the Imazighen when they’ve visited my blog, and understand the significance and importance of our culture.

Is there anywhere else you can be found on the internet if other want to network with you?

I don’t use other social media, maybe in the future I will!

In this series  Namibian-born photographer Margaret Courtney-Clarke’s documents the daily lives and historical traditions of the Imazighen women of North Africa whose centuries old culture is slowly being forced to give in to the pressures of Arabisation and Westernization.

The photographs have been cataloged in this book.

60 plays
Thalweg

TODAY’S CLASSIC TUNEThalweg - Ad Ezzi Ssaâ

Beautiful song by Imazighen (Berber) band Thalweg, as discovered through the blog Kahina.

Berber activists in Algeria say authorities prevented them from carrying out a march to mark their new year.

An estimated third of Algeria is ethnically Berber or Amazigh, the original inhabitants of North Africa with their own language and history.

Activists from the Movement for the Autonomy of the Kabylie had planned to mark the Berber New Year with a march in Tizi Ouzou, the capital of Algeria’s predominantly Berber Kabylie region.

Like most North African countries, Algeria describes itself as Arab and has long suppressed Berber identity movements.

A demonstration a few days ago by the banned movement during French President Francois Hollande’s visit was also prevented.

The movement believes the Berber culture and language is sidelined in Algeria, where the official language is Arabic.

AFRICANS YOU SHOULD KNOW:Daya Ult Yenfaq Tajrawt
Daya Ult Yenfaq Tajrawt was an Imazighen religious and military leader in the region known then (the 7th century) as Numidia, Algeria today, who dedicated her life to leading Imazighen resistance campaigns against Arab expansion of the Umayyad Dynasty in Numidia. Her Muslim opponents gave her the nickname al-Kāhinat (the priestess soothsayer) for her reputed ability to foresee the future. 



Dihyā succeeded Kusaila as the war leader of the Berber tribes in the 680s and opposed the encroaching Arab armies of the Umayyad Dynasty. Hasan ibn al-Nu’man marched from Egypt and captured the major Byzantine city of Carthage and other cities (see Umayyad conquest of North Africa ). 
Searching for another enemy to defeat, he was told that the most powerful monarch in North Africa was “the queen of the Berbers” Dihyā, and accordingly marched into Numidia. The armies met near Meskiana in the present-day province of Oum el-Bouaghi, Algeria. She defeated Hasan so soundly that he fled Ifriqiya and holed up in Cyrenaica (Libya) for four or five years. 
Realizing that the enemy was too powerful and bound to return, she was said to have embarked on a scorched earth campaign, which had little impact on the mountain and desert tribes, but lost her the crucial support of the sedentary oasis-dwellers. Instead of discouraging the Arab armies, her desperate decision hastened defeat.
Hasan eventually returned and, aided by communications with the captured officer adopted by Dihyā, defeated her at a locality (presumably in present-day Algeria) about which there is some uncertainty. Before the battle, foreseeing the outcome, she sent her two real sons over to the Arab army under the care of the adopted son, and Hasan is said to have given one of them charge of a section of his forces.
According to some accounts, al-Kāhinat died fighting the invaders, sword in hand, a warrior’s death. Other accounts say she committed suicide by swallowing poison rather than be taken by the enemy. This final act occurred in the 690s or 700s, with 702 or 703 given as the most likely year. In that year, she was, according to Ibn Khaldun, 127 years old. This is evidently yet another of the many myths which surround her.
Her sons Bagay and Khanchla, converted, and led the berber army to Iberia.
Another, lesser known account of Dihyā claimed that she had an interest in early studies of desert birds. While this view may or may not be plausible, some evidence has been recovered at the site of her death place, modern day Algeria. Several fragments of early parchment with a painting of a bird on them were found, although there’s no way to conclude the fragments were hers. However, it is possible that she began her interest while in Libya, as the painting was of a Libyan bird species.
Supposedly, she had a passion for ornithology that shaped science and learning in the early Middle East. Today, many look up to her for her great findings and independence.
In later centuries, Dihyā’s legend was used to bolster the claims of Berbers in al-Andalus against Arab claims of ethnic supremacy—in the early modern age, she was used by French colonials, Berber nationalists, Arab Nationalists, North African Jews, North African feminists, and Maghrebi nationalists alike for their own didactic purposes.
(source)

AFRICANS YOU SHOULD KNOW:Daya Ult Yenfaq Tajrawt

Daya Ult Yenfaq Tajrawt was an Imazighen religious and military leader in the region known then (the 7th century) as Numidia, Algeria today, who dedicated her life to leading Imazighen resistance campaigns against Arab expansion of the Umayyad Dynasty in Numidia. Her Muslim opponents gave her the nickname al-Kāhinat (the priestess soothsayer) for her reputed ability to foresee the future. 

Dihyā succeeded Kusaila as the war leader of the Berber tribes in the 680s and opposed the encroaching Arab armies of the Umayyad Dynasty. Hasan ibn al-Nu’man marched from Egypt and captured the major Byzantine city of Carthage and other cities (see Umayyad conquest of North Africa ).

Searching for another enemy to defeat, he was told that the most powerful monarch in North Africa was “the queen of the Berbers” Dihyā, and accordingly marched into Numidia. The armies met near Meskiana in the present-day province of Oum el-BouaghiAlgeria. She defeated Hasan so soundly that he fled Ifriqiya and holed up in Cyrenaica (Libya) for four or five years.

Realizing that the enemy was too powerful and bound to return, she was said to have embarked on a scorched earth campaign, which had little impact on the mountain and desert tribes, but lost her the crucial support of the sedentary oasis-dwellers. Instead of discouraging the Arab armies, her desperate decision hastened defeat.

Hasan eventually returned and, aided by communications with the captured officer adopted by Dihyā, defeated her at a locality (presumably in present-day Algeria) about which there is some uncertainty. Before the battle, foreseeing the outcome, she sent her two real sons over to the Arab army under the care of the adopted son, and Hasan is said to have given one of them charge of a section of his forces.

According to some accounts, al-Kāhinat died fighting the invaders, sword in hand, a warrior’s death. Other accounts say she committed suicide by swallowing poison rather than be taken by the enemy. This final act occurred in the 690s or 700s, with 702 or 703 given as the most likely year. In that year, she was, according to Ibn Khaldun, 127 years old. This is evidently yet another of the many myths which surround her.

Her sons Bagay and Khanchla, converted, and led the berber army to Iberia.

Another, lesser known account of Dihyā claimed that she had an interest in early studies of desert birds. While this view may or may not be plausible, some evidence has been recovered at the site of her death place, modern day Algeria. Several fragments of early parchment with a painting of a bird on them were found, although there’s no way to conclude the fragments were hers. However, it is possible that she began her interest while in Libya, as the painting was of a Libyan bird species.

Supposedly, she had a passion for ornithology that shaped science and learning in the early Middle East. Today, many look up to her for her great findings and independence.

In later centuries, Dihyā’s legend was used to bolster the claims of Berbers in al-Andalus against Arab claims of ethnic supremacy—in the early modern age, she was used by French colonials, Berber nationalists, Arab Nationalists, North African Jews, North African feminists, and Maghrebi nationalists alike for their own didactic purposes.

(source)

Happy Yennayer! Happy Imazighen (Berber) New Year 2963 to all our Imazighen readers!

Imazighen women during a festival celebrating Imazighen culture.

Marrakech, Morocco. 1995.

The tattooed hands of an Imazighen (Berber) woman in her traditional party clothes. 1971.

Marrakech, Morocco

© Burt Glinn/Magnum Photos

homininae:

Amazigh (Berber) Man

Sahara, Douz Oasis, south Tunisia (by maksid)

(via algerianculture)