DYNAMIC AFRICA

African-based news, lifestyle & popular culture platform that brings you stories and information concerning Africa and the African diaspora. Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is a rich content-driven creative space with a Pan-African outlook established as an expressive platform for African experiences, African culture and African stories.


Dynamic Africa is a diverse multimedia platform, which curates global ideas, memes, attitudes and other phenomena that shape popular culture, with both a local and global African perspective.




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Posts tagged "ghana"

NEW MUSIC: BLITZ the AMBASSADOR -“RUMBLE”.

Bukom, a small locality in Ghana’s capital of Accra, is a place that has a sentimental historywith boxing. The town has produced some of the best boxers to come out of Africa including world renowned athletes such as Bukom Banku, Azumah Nelson, Kwame Asante, Ike Qautery and Joshua Clottey.

Exploring that relationship in today’s Bukom, and inspired by Muhammad Ali’s trip to Africa in the 70s,Blitz returns to the town to deliver a boxing-inspired black and white portrait of Bukom.

Rumble is taken from Blitz’s upcoming EP Diasporadical set for release in March 2015. Expect a video and a new single every month until then.

Download ‘Rumble’ for free here.

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All Africa, All the time.

Live and Acoustic: Y’Akoto Performs “Perfect Timing”.

Perfect Timing, the debut single from her latest album Moody Blues,put me on to the German-Ghanaian singer Y’Akoto's music thanks to it's superfun, colourful and carefree story-telling video shot in Accra, and of course, Y'Akoto's incredibly rich and soulful voice.

As we’re taken on a musical journey through the sights and sounds ofeveryday Accra, we’re accompanied by Y’akoto’s band of road bikers and bmx riders, each one stylishly dressed in a mixture of contemporary cuts, ankara fabrics and wax print threads. But once the video ends, it’s Y’Akoto’s singing that sticks with you. Perfect Timing is perfectly catchy with the right doses of pop, soul, and lite jazz.

Scrounging the internet for live renditions of the song, I came across this gem and decided to make a playlist of some of her other acoustic and live sessions.

Enjoy!

"The challenge is that when you’re telling a story that is unorthodox and people aren’t so familiar with it, it’s hard to make it cool. And, you know, it’s taking a lot of us, a lot of work really trying to tell this African story.”

- Blitz the Ambassador saying some highly resonating words during a recent interview with NPR

Ghana and Nigeria to Represent Africa at Women’s U20 World Cup.

In a little over 24 hours, the 7th edition of the Women’s U20 World Cup kicks off in Toronto, Canada.

Ghana, one of the two African teams at the tournament, face the host nation on opening night and sit in a group with North Korea and Finland.

Fellow West Africans Nigeria sit in Group C with England, South Korea and Mexico, and play their first match on Wednesday against Mexico.

Join Dynamic Africa on Facebook and Twitter as we provide updates on the the two African teams at the tournament!

NEW MUSIC: Benjamin Clementine - Condolence.

Doom soul British-Ghanaian singer Benjamin Clementine walks a strenuous and lonely road in the new music video for his song Condolence. 

Look out for his Glorious You EP out August 25th. 

I’m still in love with his song I Won’t Complain.

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NEW MUSIC: Y’AKOTO - Perfect Timing.

With a new album a little over a month away from release, German-Ghanaian singer Y’akoto (nee Jennifer Yaa Akoto Kieck) has given us our first taste of her sophomore effort Moody Blues with the single and accompanying video for her song ‘Perfect Timing’.

Coated with a little bit of modern jazz, a soulful blues-y essence and charming pop catchy-ness, the uber cute Y’akoto takes us on a mini-tour of Accra atop her road bike (BMX riders are becoming synonymous with the city), followed by a band of stylishly dressed followers as she relays a story of a lost opportunity for love, lots of bad luck and how she’s learned to let go.

Ghanaian World Cup Fans Seek Asylum and Refugee Status in Brazil.

According to Brazilian authorities, some 200 Ghanaian Muslims fans that attended the World Cup have requested asylum in Brazil citing inter-religious conflicts in their country.

Another 1,000 Ghanaians are expected to request refugee status once the tournament is over, police said.

(cont. reading)

Algeria Football Team Given A Heroes Welcome Upon Return From Brazil.

In contrast to the reactions shown by officials from the other African countries that competed in this year’s FIFA World Cup, the Algerian national team were given a hero-like welcome upon their return home from Brazil.

Having been one of two African countries to make it to the round of 16, the team achieved victory by being the first African team to score four goals at one match in World Cup history, and also became the first Algerian team to progress beyond the group stage at the World Cup.

Although they were defeated 2-1 by Germany, the support from their fellow Algerians remained strong even after their loss, so much so that the Prime Minister Abdelmalek Sellal personally greeted and thanked the players as they arrived home. The team has also decided to donate their  prize money to the people of Gaza saying that they needed it more than the team did.

Talk of money amongst the other African teams begun even before kickoff with Cameroon refusing to board their plane over wage disputes.

During the tournament, Ghana’s presence was marred by a bonus money airlifting scandal, Nigeria refused to attend practice over bonus money issues and had to be reassured by the president that they would receive money owed to them, and Cameroon is being investigated following match-fixing claims. Both Cameroon and Ghana’s Presidents have called for investigations into their teams’ performances at the World Cup. Algeria and the Ivory Coast are the only two African countries that were controversy free during this year’s World Cup.

And where Nigeria’s coach Stephen Keshi resigned from his duties as Nigeria’s head coach, despite winning last year’s Africa Cup of Nations (the second man as player and coach to achieve this title), and having gotten the Super Eagles to the last 16 stage of the World Cup, Algeria are keeping Bosnian coach Vahid Halilhodzic.

Keshi’s resignation has not been made formal yet but there are already talks that he might become Bafana Bafana’s new coach.

Despite the controversies surrounding the West African teams, often attributed to the corrupt practices of soccer officials in their countries, this World Cup was monumental for Africa in many ways. From having two teams in the round of 16 for the first time ever, to Asamoah Gyan’s top African player scorer feat.

See footage of the Algerian team’s return parade.

NEW MUSIC: BLITZ the AMBASSADOR ft Emicida & Y’akoto - All Around the World/Respect Mine.

Globetrotting Ghanaian MC Blitz the Ambassador has just dropped the music video for the latest single off his recently released album Afropolitan Dreams.

In true Afropolitan style, Blitz takes this opportune time to not only visit a part of the world that is home to the largest African-descended population outside of the African continent, but a country that many eyes around the world are currently focused on due to the 2014 FIFA World Cup. For his All Around the World/Respect Mine music video, featuring local Brazilian artists Emicida and Y’akoto, Blitz shows us multiple sides of Sao Paolo - from the facets of Afro-Brazilian culture many of us are familiar with, to the anti-World Cup protests we should all be familiar with.

Catch Blitz live at the Brooklyn Museum on July 5th.

"Africa Day" at the World Cup - the most fruitful day for African teams in Brazil so far.

A lot of history was made between the two African teams that played back-to-back at the World Cup on Saturday.

Although Ghana didn’t win their match against Germany, their 2-2 draw saw the Black Stars shinning in a way that proved that they are indeed a world class team worthy of a position in football’s biggest tournament. After scoring the equalizing goal for Ghana in the 54th minute, just three minutes after Germany’s first goal, 24-year-old French born winger Andre Ayew became the only Ghanaian player to score at all their 2014 World Cup matches so far. Along with Cote D’Ivoire’s Gervinho, Ayew is the top scoring African player at this year’s World Cup, so far.

As many wondered when Asamoah Gyan would finally show up at the World Cup, he delivered a stunning shot into Germany’s net less than 10 minutes after Ayew’s header. This made Baby Jet the top scoring African player of all time, at the World Cup, along with Cameroonian football legend Roger Milla.

During Nigeria’s game against Bosnia and Herzegovina, Peter Osaze Odemwingie’s winning goal ended the 16 year and nine game win-less drought for the Super Eagles at the World Cup. So far, Nigeria and Mexico are the only teams to not concede a goal at this year’s World Cup.

NEW MUSC: Sarkodie ft Castro - Adonai.

Fresh off his MTV African Music Awards win earlier this month, Ghanaian MC Sarkodie has dropped his latest track with a music video filmed in Johannesburg. ‘Adonai’, as the title suggests, is a praise song where the rappers (delivering their musical sermon in Twi) give thanks to the Lord Almighty for seeing them through all the hardships they’ve gone through.

As much as we appreciate the beautiful scenes of South Africa’s city of gold, we have to agree with a YouTube commenter who pointed out that the video would’ve had more character and a greater sense of authenticity had it been filmed in a Ghanaian church (we’re sure there’s at least one in Jozi).

On Africa and the World Cup by Nate Holder.

We all know that Africa is not a country, nor are we a homogenous group of people aligned in culture and interest from Cape to Cairo. So why is that during the World Cup, individual African teams are burdened with being representatives of the entire continent?

One thing that has always caught my attention is how Africa and African football teams are spoken about at the World Cup. It seems as though the last African team left in the tournament somehow carries the hope of not only their nation, but the whole continent of Africa. Headlines such as ‘Ghana – Africa’s Best Hope in Tough World Cup Pool’ and ‘Why do African teams underperform at the World Cup?’ are common and go without questioning if the idea itself makes sense. The idea that African teams are spoken about in very different terms to teams from the rest of the world. Listen closely at how many times commentators and presenters will say things such as, ‘These players are not just representing their country, but are also representing Africa’.

Though Ghana were knocked out of the 2010 World Cup by Uruguay, the fact that they reached the quarterfinals was seen as not only a triumph, but a possible glimpse into the future as Ghana equaled the best result by an African team in World Cup history. Watching Luis Suarez’ handball and sending off, Asamoah Gyan’s subsequent penalty miss and Abreu’s audacious chip to win it was one of the most heartbreaking events in recent World Cup history. It endeared Ghana and in particular Asamoah Gyan, to hearts all over the world; not just African hearts.

In a BBC World Cup preview show some nights ago, Reggie Yates spoke about the history of African sides at the World Cup and about the chances of Ghana escaping the group of death this year. He quoted the African saying, ‘If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together’. But on a continent where approximately 2000-3000 different languages are spoken, not to mention possibly 8000 dialects, the idea of the “African proverb” makes no sense. Africa is not a country. To even think of referring to a saying as a “European” or “South American” proverb is almost unheard of, so why is Africa excluded from this consideration? Lately, in talk of the World Cup, it often seems as though Ghana, Cameroon, Ivory Coast, Nigeria and Algeria all get lumped together when the need to explain how they perform and where they come from arises.

Speaking of under-performing, do African teams really underperform?

If we go by appearances in the last 16 stage (that is countries that qualify from their group), we see that Africa is actually the 4th most successful continent over the last 6 World Cups. The 3rd most successful is North America, with 9 appearances in the knockout stages to Africa’s 5 (Asia has 4, while Oceania has 1). When it comes to quarter-final appearances however, Africa beats North America 3:1, with quarter-final appearances by Ghana (2010), Senegal (2002) and Cameroon (1990) to the one appearance by the USA in 2002. So in terms of progression in the tournament, African sides come in 3rd after Europe and South America. South Korea earned Asia’s only spot in the quarter finals of the 2002 World Cup and Oceania’s furthest foray was in the last 16 with Australia in 2006. So do African teams really under achieve? I’ll leave that to you to decide.

Did Germany carry the hopes of Europe when they reached the final of the 2006 World Cup? Do the defending champions Spain go into this years tournament being spoken of as Europe’s best hope of a World Cup? Much has been made of the socio-economic problems that Brazil has, and we have heard over and over again, that failure for Brazil to win the World Cup would be a disaster for its people. Would it be a disaster for the rest of the South American continent? Of course not. Perhaps many Argentinians would relish seeing Brazil knocked out before them. After all, Brazil represents Brazilians. Greece for Greeks. Iran for Iranians. Cameroon for…Africans? Sure many Africans will hope that other African side do well, but I’m sure an Ivorian would much prefer to see Ivory Coast progress rather than supporting the African nation with the best squad, out of a sense of ‘Africanism’?

If Nigeria reach the World Cup final against Brazil on the 13th July, many Africans will be cheering for Nigeria. Maybe, just maybe, there will also be some Africans watching the same game wearing Neymar Jr on their backs.

Read his blog and follow Nate Holder on Twitter.

World Cup 2014 Fan Favourite Posters created by Jon Rogers.

Vancouver designer Jon Rogers created a series of posters depicting the fan favourite player, according to Bleacher Report, from each country participating in this year’s World Cup. Above are the posters of players from the African teams currently playing in Brazil for a chance at football’s most prestigious trophy.

EVENT: TALK PARTY at Passions Cafe, Osu. this evening 6PM - 9PM. Video premier + Ghana Premier “An Oversimplification of Her Beauty”.

The TALK PARTY series is back after a short hiatus in April. This time with a two-for-one banger in May. 

MUSIC SHOW: Mensa Highlife grew up in Sweden, the UK and the U.S. The London years shaped a full-fledged music-producer while the U.S. years shaped an even sharper poet and lyricist. This itinerant lifestyle became the inspiration behind a quirky Jazz- Funk expression that has come to define his art today.

Now back in Ghana and inspired by the traditional mystic of sparse drum rhythms, Mensa Highlife is experimenting with a soulful unity between the past and present. He is currently promoting the single “Ofori’s Story” and Mensa will premiere it live at the Talk Party Series this month. He will also be performing songs from an upcoming album.

FILM SHOW: We are also super excited to premiere Terrence Nance’s acclaimed film, “An Oversimplification of Her Beauty” in Ghana.

The film has played at Sundance and the global film circuit and is now debuting in Accra. “An Oversimplification” is a splendid exploration of love and mourning that blends animation, drama, fantasy and sonic color together. The story follows a quixotic artist who falls for a lovely lady and she doesn’t quite fall for him. He then makes a film about their affair and shows it to her.

Director Terrence Nance will join us for a Q&A via twitter.

Maya Angelou in Africa: The Egypt and Ghana years.
In the 1950s, Maya Angelou moved to New York where she later met and began a romantic relationship with South African anti-apartheid activist Vusumzi L. Make. The two soon moved to Cairo, Egypt, in 1961 along with Angelou’s son Guy Johnson. Angelou and Make lived together in Cairo for a short time where Angelou served as the editor of the English language weekly publication The Arab Observer.
After separating from Make in 1962, Angelou and her son moved to Accra, Ghana, where Angelou joined many other African-American expatriates living in the country. There, whilst her son attended college and later recovered from an automobile accident, she served as an instructor and assistant administrator at the University of Ghana’s School of Music and Drama, worked as feature editor for The African Review and wrote for The Ghanaian Times and the Ghanaian Broadcasting Company.
During Malcolm X’s 1964 visit to Ghana, the two met in the country’s capital city (pictured) and began corresponding. That same year, Angelou relocated back to the United States with the intention of assisting Malcolm X build his new Organization of Afro-American Unity, however, Malcolm X would be assassinated a few months after her arrival in the US.
Her book All God’s Children Need Traveling Shoes (1986): Explores Angelou’s experiences living in Ghana with her son from 1962 to 1965.

Maya Angelou in Africa: The Egypt and Ghana years.

In the 1950s, Maya Angelou moved to New York where she later met and began a romantic relationship with South African anti-apartheid activist Vusumzi L. Make. The two soon moved to Cairo, Egypt, in 1961 along with Angelou’s son Guy Johnson. Angelou and Make lived together in Cairo for a short time where Angelou served as the editor of the English language weekly publication The Arab Observer.

After separating from Make in 1962, Angelou and her son moved to Accra, Ghana, where Angelou joined many other African-American expatriates living in the country. There, whilst her son attended college and later recovered from an automobile accident, she served as an instructor and assistant administrator at the University of Ghana’s School of Music and Drama, worked as feature editor for The African Review and wrote for The Ghanaian Times and the Ghanaian Broadcasting Company.

During Malcolm X’s 1964 visit to Ghana, the two met in the country’s capital city (pictured) and began corresponding. That same year, Angelou relocated back to the United States with the intention of assisting Malcolm X build his new Organization of Afro-American Unity, however, Malcolm X would be assassinated a few months after her arrival in the US.

Her book All God’s Children Need Traveling Shoes (1986): Explores Angelou’s experiences living in Ghana with her son from 1962 to 1965.