DYNAMIC AFRICA

Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is diverse multi-media curated blog with a Pan-African outlook that seeks to create an expressive platform for African experiences, stories and African cultures.



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Posts tagged "gabon"

#CHAN2014 Updates: who’s through to the semi-finals?

After being down 0-3 againnst the Lions of the Atlas Mountains, Nigeria beat Morocco 4-3, scoring 3 goals in the second half and their winning goal in extra time, to make it through to the semi-finals of the tournament.

Zimbabwe made history for qualifying for the semi-finals round for the first time ever in the team’s history after beating Mali 2-1.

The heated match between Libya and Gabon saw the former team qualified by beating Gabon 4-2 in penalties.

Ghana’s 1-0 win, with a goal that came about as a result of a penalty kick, was regarded with a lot of controversy by many DR Congo fans on twitter who claim the ref did not handle the game fairly.

Upcoming matches: Semi-Finals (Weds. 25th Jan)

  • Libya vs Zimbabwe - 5pm CAT
  • Nigeria vs Ghana - 8:30 CAT

(all images via CAF)

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All Africa, All the time.

The nominations are in for BBC’s African Footballer of the Year competition for 2013. 

This year’s five players all hail from West Africa and represent four African countries, namely Gabon, Nigeria, Burkina Faso and Ivory Coast. No surprise there considering how well West African teams did at this year’s Africa Cup of Nations, with Nigeria taking the title and Burkina Faso coming in second place. 

List of the nominated candidates, their nationality, and their club teams:

  • Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang - Gabon and Borussia Dortmund
  • Victor Moses - Nigeria and Liverpool (on loan from Chelsea)
  • John Mikel Obi - Nigeria and Chelsea
  • Jonathan Pitroipa - Burkina Faso and Rennes
  • Yaya Toure - Ivory Coast and Manchester City

Who would you vote for?

how-i-love-gabon:

Hypermarché Mbolo en 1976

Libreville, Gabon

By Jaimelbv

(via how-i-love-gabon)

The New African Photography - Emeka Okereke: Invisible Borders

"100 years ago, photography was a colonial tool…"

"A photography is a window and not the view" - Emeka Okereke

For decades, the camera was used as a tool through which colonial governments and Western photojournalists alike imposed their own views on Africa through the restrictions of 2D imagery, defining Africa without much, if any, input from those whose faces were plastered on postcards, posters, magazines and media platforms across the world.

Profiling a new crop of African photographers using their lens to transform and inspire both change and development, Al Jazeera opens us up to the world of Nigerian photographer Emeka Okereke, founder of Invisible Borders - a organization that gives ‘African artists a space to define Africa for themselves’. In this video, the group travels on their annual roadtrip within Africa, going from Lagos to Kinshasa, as a means of developing young African artists through the lens of photojournalism.

A must-watch journey.

FILM: “Tu seras mon Allié” (Dir. Rosine Mfetgo Mbakam, 2012)

Cameroonian director Rosine Mfetgo Mbakam’s most recent short film follows the story of Domé, a 35 year old woman from Gabon played by actress Bwanga Pilipili, who is stopped at the airport in Brussels, Belgium, due to discrepancies with her paperwork.

Domé then faces a long and grueling ordeal in the form of an interrogation by Belgian airport officials, unsure of whether or not she’ll realize her dream of entering the European country.

The English translation of the film’s title is ‘You Will Be My Ally’.

Libreville, Gabon

exiledpoetssociety:

Boat on Ogooue River at Sunset , Gabon
Unknown

exiledpoetssociety:

Boat on Ogooue River at Sunset , Gabon

Unknown


This mask is worn in masquerades during funeral celebrations.
The white color, a genderless attribute, signifies peace, the deities, the spirits of the dead, and the afterlife. The domed forehead, high cheek bones, delicately etched eyes, high arched eyebrows, beautiful coiffure, and streamlined chin all represent feminine beauty of the Punu people.
The scarification arranged in a lozenge on the forehead and the the hair style similar to a bivalve shell are also feminine attributes. It is said that the scarification has sexual meaning, an argument that supports that these masks are female representations. Those without scarification are said to be male.
The lozenge generally is made up of nine fish scales.
To the Punu people, the number nine in multiples of three has symbolic meaning, recurring in many rituals and ceremonies. 
A dancer wears this mask, representing the spirit of a female ancestor, and a costume covering his entire body made of skins and raffia. The dancer tilts this mask forward and preforms on the stilts, carrying a whip of dried grasses in each hand. 
As this dancer towers over his spectators, he is said to be dancing between the living world and the world of the ancestors.
Punu masks represent the idealized beauty of Punu women, and should only be carved by Punu men.
(source 1; 2)

This mask is worn in masquerades during funeral celebrations.

The white color, a genderless attribute, signifies peace, the deities, the spirits of the dead, and the afterlife. The domed forehead, high cheek bones, delicately etched eyes, high arched eyebrows, beautiful coiffure, and streamlined chin all represent feminine beauty of the Punu people.

The scarification arranged in a lozenge on the forehead and the the hair style similar to a bivalve shell are also feminine attributes. It is said that the scarification has sexual meaning, an argument that supports that these masks are female representations. Those without scarification are said to be male.

The lozenge generally is made up of nine fish scales.

To the Punu people, the number nine in multiples of three has symbolic meaning, recurring in many rituals and ceremonies.

A dancer wears this mask, representing the spirit of a female ancestor, and a costume covering his entire body made of skins and raffia. The dancer tilts this mask forward and preforms on the stilts, carrying a whip of dried grasses in each hand. 

As this dancer towers over his spectators, he is said to be dancing between the living world and the world of the ancestors.

Punu masks represent the idealized beauty of Punu women, and should only be carved by Punu men.

(source 1; 2)

jupiterworld:

#Libreville #sun #Playa #ismaelsankara #InstapicFrames #PicCells #ColorSplurge #InstaSplash

(via jupiterworld-deactivated2013051)

how-i-love-gabon:

En train, arrivée à Franceville! by huguesn on Flickr.

A train arriving in Franceville, Gabon.

A market in Franceville, Gabon

by Emilio.P.Photografia on Flickr.

(via how-i-love-gabon)

A young woman’s hair is styled in traditional “corn rows” at a salon in Libreville, Gabon.

1980

© Bruno Barbey/Magnum Photos

A fashionable wedding in Libreville, Gabon.

1984.

© Bruno Barbey/Magnum Photos

Members of the women’s armed guards contingent at a Presidential ceremony in Libreville, Gabon.

1984

© Bruno Barbey/Magnum Photos

GABON. 1984. A young man rests on a boat cruising up the Ogooue River.

© Bruno Barbey/Magnum Photos