DYNAMIC AFRICA

Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is diverse multi-media curated blog with a Pan-African outlook that seeks to create an expressive platform for African experiences, stories and African cultures.



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Made up of mostly of people of Eritrean and Sudanese descent, thousands of Africans living in Israel marched through the country’s capital to protest the ill-treatment of African migrants.

According to BBC Africa, the protest was spurred by “a law that allows illegal immigrants to be detained for a year without trial.”

Full story on the BBC’s website.

FRIDAY INSPIRATION: Eritrean-Canadian model Grace Mahary in Paris photographed by Wayne Tippetts.

FRIDAY INSPIRATION: Eritrean-Canadian model Grace Mahary in Paris photographed by Wayne Tippetts.

kafiristan:

Eritrean Survivors of Torture Camps in the Sinai

1. The child of an Eritrean survivor of a torture camp in the Sinai photographed at the Eritrean Womens Center in south Tel Aviv, an organization that helps female survivors of the torture camps after they arrive in Israel.

2. An Eritrean survivor of torture camps in the Sinai sleeps at a safe house in the Ard Lewar neighborhood of Giza.

3. Mikele, an Eritrean survivor of torture camps in the Sinai. He poses for a photograph at a safe house in Cairo, displaying multiple torture marks on his back.

4. Seble, a 24 year old Eritrean woman that survived the torture in the Sinai, and now lives at a shelter in south Tel Aviv.

5. Mikele, an Eritrean survivor of torture camps in the Sinai. He poses for a photograph at a safe house in Cairo, covering his face with a cross to hide his identity, and displaying multiple torture marks on his upper body.

6. Beserate, an 18 year old Eritrean immigrant recently released from a torture camp in the Sinai, recovers from a skin transplantation surgery necessary to treat a severe infection on her ankle, caused by the shackles that were chained to her ankle during her time at the torture camp.

7. An Eritrean survivor of the Sinai torture camps living in a cramped apartment in the Ard Lewar neighborhood of Giza.

8.  Filmon, 28, an Eritrean immigrant, lost portions of both hands at a torture camp in the Sinai. He now lives at a state-run shelter in Israel.

9. Weini, 25, is an Eritrean immigrant that survived the torture camps in the Sinai. She now lives at a shelter in south Tel Aviv.

10. Hagos, 23, is an Eritrean survivor of the torture camps in the Sinai. He is now living in a state-run shelter in Israel.

By Moises Saman.

(via shinkhalai-deactivated20140128)

Eritrea, 1995.
Ph: Raymond Depardon

Eritrea, 1995.

Ph: Raymond Depardon

WOMEN’S MONTH STORY HIGHLIGHT: Meron Estefanos

This American Life - 502: This Call May Be Recorded… To Save Your Life

In 2011, Meron Estefanos, an Eritrean-born expatriate living and working in Stockholm, Sweden, as a radio journalist and human rights activist gets a disturbing tip - a relative of a man who was kidnapped and is being tortured and held for ransom in the Sinai desert gives Estefanos a cell phone number where a group of Eritrean hostages can be reached.

She calls the number and her whole life changes.

The entire story gave me chills.

TW: rape, torture, violence, graphic language, trauma.

From TAL: Meron has set up a PayPal account to collect donations to help the families of Eritrean hostages in Sinai. To donate, go to PayPal.com and transfer to the account soscare@yahoo.com. Note that the account is not set up as an official charity.

AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

afroklectic:

Alien Flower x Lurve Magazine x Issue 7

Model: Grace Mahary

Photography: Elle Muliarchyk

Stylist: Peju Famojure

fuckyeaheritrea:

Temesgen Yared performed such a beautiful song at last year’s Martyrs Day in Asmara. Being in the precense of thousands of war veterans, graveyards, children with no parents, and ect really gives you an insight of how significant the wars in Eritrea were.

Ksenu semetana wetru ab lbna alekum.


#fh

penamerican:

Eritrea: 20 years of independence but still no freedom

Today – 24 May – is Eritrean Independence Day, marking a victory won at the cost of many lives and sacrifices. But now, 20 years on, many of the architects of independence languish in secret prisons, without any charge or trial, because they called for reform in their new country. Alongside them are thousands of political prisoners detained because they tried to work as journalists, tried to practice their religion, or were suspected of opposition to the government.

Amnesty International believes that not one of the at least 10,000 political prisoners jailed by the Eritrean authorities over the last 20 years has been charged with a crime or taken to court. In hundreds of cases those prisoners have never had access to their families, and relatives don’t know if their loved one is alive or dead. Some families have lived with this uncertainty for 10 or even 20 years.


Read Amnesty International’s May 9 report on widespread arbitrary detention in Eritrea here

Vintage postcard of a man from Eritrea.

Vintage photographs of Kunama people, a Nilotic ethnic group who live mostly in Eritrea and Ethiopia where they are a minority in both.

just-wanna-travel:

Keren, Eritrea

fuckyeaheritrea:

An Eritrean solider.

fuckyeaheritrea:

An Eritrean solider.

Portrait of Canadian-Eritrean model photographed by The Locals.

ryanewithane:

Marco Barbon

His biography only says:

“Born in Rome in 1972
Lives and works in Paris”

These are pictures from his series Asmara Dream, which he says “The subject of my book is the city of Asmara, more precisely that particular sensation of suspended time and subtle melancholy that struck me the first time I was there. The Italian flair and beauty of the city is something you can not forget after having visited Eritrea.”

(Source: http://www.marcobarbon.com/)

Portraits of Beni-Amer men from Eritrea, a mixed ethnic group comprised of the Beja, the Tigre, and the Biher-Tigrinya.

Their afros are slicked down with mud at the bottom. Not entirely sure of the significance of this hairstyle.