DYNAMIC AFRICA

Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is diverse multi-media curated blog with a Pan-African outlook that seeks to create an expressive platform for African experiences, stories and African cultures.



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Cameroonian singer Dencia fiercely defends her ‘Whitenicious’ product in BBC interview.

Whether or not giving Dencia and her skin hyper-pigmentation and dark spot reducing product attention is a good thing or not, the media have been giving her the spotlight quite a bit lately.

After reports of her sold-out skin whitening cream surfaced on the internet earlier this year, EBONY were quick to chat to the artist to get her side of the story. Following that, rumours began to fly around stating Dencia could possibly be interviewed by Oprah’s The O Network for an in production documentary titled ‘Light Girls’, following the success of the ‘Dark Girls’ film.

Now here, in a recent interview with the BBC, Dencia visited the Focus on Africa studios to defend her product, address her transitioning skin tone and whether or not self-hate had anything to do with it. In it, she also alludes to the process of relaxing one’s hair as being similar to addressing what she refers to as hyper-pigmentation and others call skin bleaching.

I say, that which we call skin lightening by any other name would still be as terrible.

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All Africa, All the time.

Ouilfreed Meyou - Oussai You Di Go.

So grateful for the small wave of talented Cameroonian artists falling on my radar. Sung in Pidgin, Ouilfreed Meyou’s “Oussai You Di Go” is a heartfelt love song of a man who wants nothing more than for his lover to return to him.

Although it was released in 2013, I’ve only just been put on to this song and aside from my weakness for romantic Pidgin songs, I’m a sucker for the light soukous feel embedded in the melody.

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All Africa, All the time.

New Music: Jade Jana -  Di Gwensa Be.

"Di Gwesna Be" is the debut single and video from Afro-Reggae-Soul-Pop Cameroonian artist Jade Jana.

Hailing from the capital city Yaounde, Jade Jana is a young composer and singer whose love for music was influenced by her artistic maternal grandmother.

Sung in Bassa, “Di Gwensa Be” tells the story of a young woman writing to her ex-lover on their past relationship.

Really great song with a smooth and soulful feel.

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All Africa, All the time.

A great weekend for West African football

Three epic football matches occurred this past weekend with each involving great gains for West African football. 

In a fiery game between Chelsea and Manchester United, Cameroonian striker Samuel Eto’o wow’d fans and rivals alike with his spectacular hat-trick that ensured the Mourinho-led team a solid victory against the Red Devils who were on home turf.

On Sunday, the last games for Group A in the Africa Nations Championship took place in South Africa. Nigeria and Mali were the first teams to progress from the group stages and qualify for the next round in this year’s CHAN tournament.

Hosts Bafana Bafana were chowed by the Super Eagles who scored their first two goals in the first half of the game with a brilliant goal from Ejike Uzoenyi in the 22nd minute, and another goal in the 32nd minute scored by Rabiu Ali after a foul from South Africa’s keeper lead to a penalty kick. Although South Africa managed a goal in the second half, with a third goal from Nigeria already in the net, it was far too little too late for the home squad.

In another West Africa vs Southern Africa showdown, Mali defeated opponents Mozambique 2-1 to advance with Nigeria to the next phase of the tournament.

All CHAN upcoming fixtures can be found here.

Photographs by Cameroonian photographer Joseph Chila.

September: Highlighting African Photographers

Portraits by Cameroonian photographer Samuel Finlak.

September: Highlighting African Photographers

A series of photographs taken by Cameroonian photographer Samuel Finlak.

September: Highlighting African Photographers

When speaking about some of Africa’s most iconic photographers, the name Jacques Touselle is rarely, if ever, mentioned. Touselle, whose career spans over photo years, established his own photo studio, Studio Photo Jacques, in the 1970s in Mbouda, Cameroon where, like many other photographers at the time, he photographed everyday people - from children and families, to elders, friends and couples. 

The photos above are portraits taken by Touselle in his studio in the 1970s-1980s.

September: Highlighting African Photographers

When speaking about Africa’s most iconic photographers, the name Jacques Touselle is rarely, if ever, mentioned. Touselle, whose career spans over 40 years, established his own photo studio, Studio Photo Jacques, in 1970 in Mbouda, Cameroon where, like many other photographers at the time, he photographed everyday people - from children and families, to elders and couples.

Above are a few personal photographs of Touselle and some portraits taken by him in his studio and elsewhere.

September: Highlighting African Photographers

africandiversity:

Fulani of Cameroon.

africandiversity:

Fulani of Cameroon.

Cameroonian creative and visual artist Samuel Fosso breaks gender norms, blends the traditional and contemporary, and channels various characters in what sometimes seems like an elaborate game of dress-up, through the expressive medium of studio portrait photography.

Arrival at Mora. The capital of Mandara. From Narrative of travels and discoveries in Northern and Central Africa, in the years 1822, 1823, and 1824. Vol I & II (published 1826).

The Mandara Kingdom (sometimes called Wandala) was a West African kingdom in the Mandara Mountains of what is today Cameroon. The Mandarawa people are descended from the kingdom’s inhabitants.

Tradition states that Mandara was founded shortly before 1500 by a female ruler named Soukda and a non-Mandarawa hunter named Gaya. The kingdom was first referred to by Fra Mauro (in 1459) and Leo Africanus (in 1526); the provenance of its name remains uncertain.

For the kingdom’s first century of history, its rulers warred with neighbouring groups in an effort to expand their territories.

After conquering the Dulo (or Duolo) and establishing the capital at Dulo c. 1580, the dynasty of Sankre, a war leader, began. When the Dulo made an attempt to seize the throne, the Bornu kingdom supported the claim of Aldawa Nanda, a member of Sankre’s house. Emperor Idris Alaoma of Borno personally installed Nanda as king in 1614. Bornu thus attained an influential position over Mandara.

Mai Bukar Aji, the 25th king, made Mandara a sultanate c. 1715, which it would remain for nearly two hundred years. Muslim visitors converted Bukar to Islam, and the Islamicisation of the kingdom would continue for most of the next century. The kingdom experienced a golden age of sorts under Bukar and his successor, Bukar Guiana (1773-1828). Around 1781, the Mandara defeated the kingdom of Borno in a major battle, further expanding their control in the region. At the peak of her power at the turn of the century, Mandara received tribute from some 15 chiefdoms. However, the kingdom faced a setback in 1809, when Modibo Adama, a Fulanidisciple of Usman dan Fodio, led a jihad against Mandara. Adama briefly seized Dulo, though the Mandara counterattack soon drove him from the kingdom’s borders. Adama’s defeat prompted Borno to ally with Mandara once again against the Fulani invaders.

Upon the death of ruler Bukai Dgjiama, Mandara’s non-Muslim tributaries rose up, and the Fulani attacked once more. By 1850, Borno could not pass up the opportunity to attack the weakened kingdom. This renewed conflict began to sap the kingdom’s strength, paving the way for the invasion of Muhammad Ahmad’s forces in the 1880s. In 1895 or 1896, Muhammad Ahmad’s army destroyed Dulo, marking a further decline in Mandara power. However, the kingdom continued to exist, repelling continual Fulani raids until it finally fell to them in 1893.

English explorer Dixon Denham accompanied a slave-raiding expedition from Borno into the Mandara kingdom in February 1823; though he barely escaped with his life following the raiders’ defeat, he brought back one of the first European accounts of the kingdom. In 1902, the kingdom was conquered by Germany, passing then to France in 1918. In 1960, the Mandara kingdom became a part of newly-independent Cameroon.

AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

FILM: Muna Moto (Cameroon,1974 | Dir: Jean-Pierre Dikongue-Pipa)

Ngando and Ndomé; are in love. Ngando wishes to marry Ndomé; but her family reminds him that the traditional dowry must be settled.

Unfortunately, Ngando is poor and unable to fulfill the tradition.

Ndomé; is pregnant and bears his child. According to the village tradition, she must take a husband, at least one who can afford to pay the dowry. The villagers decide that Ndomé; should marry Ngando’s uncle, who has already three sterile wives.

In despair, the young man kidnaps his daughter upon the day of the traditional feast.

Written by marfilmes

The full film can be seen at the African Film Library for a fee.

(via abstrackafricana)