DYNAMIC AFRICA

Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is diverse multi-media curated blog with a Pan-African outlook that seeks to create an expressive platform for African experiences, stories and African cultures.



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Posts tagged "burkina faso"

Zimbabwe and Morocco join Nigeria and Mali as both teams progressed to next stage of CAF / Africa Cup of Nations after defeating Burkina Faso and Uganda respectively. 

Nigeria beat hosts South Africa 3-1 on Sunday whilst Mali ousted Mozambique with a 2-1 defeat on the same day.

These four teams will meet each other at the quarter finals.
 

Women grinding millet.

Burkina Faso (circa 1930s-1940s)

Vintage photos of a ‘masquerade' in Boromo, Burkina Faso (then Haute Volta).

(circa 1930-1940)

Fulani hairstyles.

Burkina Faso

(circa 1930s-1940s)

Women in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso (the Haute Volta, a French colony in West Africa), grinding millet.

circa 1930s-1940s

A barber attends to a client in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso (then ‘Haute Volta’, a West African French colony).

circa 1930s-1940s

layout.

such a visually rich film.

Stills from Buud Yam, one of my favourite films.

WOMEN’S MONTH BOOKS TO READ: "Women’s Liberation and the African Freedom Struggle" by Thomas Sankara

AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

We do not talk of women’s emancipation as an act of charity or out of a surge of human compassion. It is a basic necessity for the triumph of the revolution. Women hold up the other half of the sky
thesoulfunkybrother:

-Burkina Faso . ‘85.

thesoulfunkybrother:

-Burkina Faso . ‘85.

You cannot carry out fundamental change without a certain amount of madness. In this case, it comes from nonconformity, the courage to turn your back on the old formulas, the courage to invent the future.
Thomas Sankara

Hair.

Gaoua, Kpan-bilou district, Burkina Faso.

Guy Le Querrec.

studioafrica:

Photographer CORNELIUS AZAGLO 

Born in 1924, photographer Cornelius Azaglo grew up in Pkalémé, Togo. Aged 19, he bought his first Kodak camera and began taking photographs on a whim. In the early 1950s, moved to Burkina Faso where he came under the guidance of two professional photographers who trained him and inspired him to develop his artistic practice. Moving again in 1955, this time to Cote d’Ivoire, he opened his own studio “Studio Du Nord”. Azaglo worked in his studio, but also took to his bike armed with his camera and a swatch  of white cloth to take pictures of the people on the fly. He continues to take photographs today.
 
He is represented by Gallery 51

Stills from La nuit de la vérité, a 2004 film directed by Burkinabe filmmaker Fanta Régina Nacro.