DYNAMIC AFRICA

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Posts tagged "athletics"

Gold For Nigeria As Ese Brume Wins Commonwealth Games Women’s Long Jump.

Two celebrations were had at the Nigerian camp in Glasgow this past week as both Blessing Okagbare and Ese Brume won gold on the very same day.

Brume, who cites fellow long jumper Okagbare as her sports hero, cleared a height of 6.56m to win Nigeria’s second medal of the night.

Okagbare would have participated in this event but it clashed with her 200m race.

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Blessing Okagbare Makes History For Nigeria at Commonwealth Games.

Nigerian athlete Blessing Okagbare sprinted to victory in Glasgow today winning gold in the women’s 100m race. Okagbare’s time of 10.85 established a new record for this event at the Commonwealth Games. She was followed by silver medalist Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica at a time of 11.03.

This marked the first time since 1994 that a Nigerian woman had won a medal in the women’s 100m the Commonwealth Games when Mary Onyali and Christy Opara-Thompson took home gold and silver respectively.

So far, all of Nigeria’s gold medals have been won by women.

17-year-old Chika Amalaha won the country’s first gold competing in the Women’s 56kg weightlifting, and fellow weightlifter Oluwatoyin Adesanmi won the women’s 63kg gold medal.

Nigeria leads overall in the weightlifting categories. for both male and female, with two gold, three silver and one bronze medal.

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WOMEN’S MONTH SPORTS: Ethiopia’s Tirunesh Dibaba, the world and Olympic champion, defends her title by winning gold in the women’s 10, 000m race at the IAAF Championships currently being held in Moscow, Russia.

Clocking in at a time of 30:43.35, the Dibaba remains unbeaten in 11 tries and claimed her third gold medal at this distance in the world championships, and her fifth world gold overall.

Gladys Cherono of Kenya took in silver, and fellow Ethiopian Belaynesh Oljira came in third.

AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

WOMEN’S MONTH SPORTS: Kenyan long-distance runner Edna Kiplagat won gold in the women’s marathon at the IAAF World Championships currently being held in Moscow, Russia.

Reigning World Champion, Kiplagat clocked in with a time of 2:25:44, 14 seconds before the next contestant finished in second place.

On defending her title, here’s what Kiplagat had to say:

"I am delighted I was able to defend my title successfully. The time of the race is unusual, because I am used to run most of my races in the morning. So during my preparation I tried to adjust my training to the time. I got confident I was going to win at 40km, when I started to increase my pace. I dedicate my victory to my husband for letting me have enough time to train"

AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

37thstate:

Nigeria’s Blessing Okagbare wins Silver in the Women’s Long Jump at the ongoing IAAF World Athletics championships Moscow 2013!

CONGRATULATIONS to Kenya’s Priscah Jeptoo who won the Women’s Race at this year’s London Marathon.

Jeptoo took advantage of a dramatic fall by Olympic champion Tiki Gelana to win the London Marathon.

Jeptoo, the 2012 Olympic silver medallist, won in two hours, 20 minutes and 13 seconds, ahead of compatriot Edna Kiplagat and Japan’s Yoko Shibui.

Earlier, Gelana was involved in a collision at a water station with Canadian wheelchair racer Josh Cassidy.

Despite falling, the Ethiopian was able to rejoin the race, but, in clear discomfort, her challenge faded.

Gelana, part of the leading pack at the 15km mark, cut across the path of Cassidy as she attempted to collect a drink.

The collision ended Cassidy’s participation in the men’s wheelchair race, which was won by Australia’s Kurt Fearnley . Britain’s six-time Paralympic gold-medal winner David Weir , aiming for a seventh London Marathon win, was fifth.

In the women’s wheelchair race, American Tatyana McFadden emerged victorious, with Britain’s Shelly Woods fourth.

McFadden also won the Boston Marathon on Monday, a race that was later the target of a terrorist bomb attack.

London paid tribute to the victims of the bombings, with a 30-second silence observed before the start of the men’s elite and mass races.

More to follow.

Kenyan athletes and medal winners David Rudisha (gold) and Timothy Kitum (bronze) pose and embrace after their victories in the men’s 800m race.

London 2012 Olympics - women’s 100 meters final

Nigeria’s Blessing Okagbare who made it all the way to the women’s 100m final finished last during this race.

(image via afrocentrico)

Contrary to popular belief, the Olympics are not just about winning. Time and time again we’ve seen athletes compete with the odds fully stacked against them, but their endurance and perseverance have been worth more than gold. Two such athletes whose spirits and sportsmanship filled crowds both at home and in the stadium with bucket loads of inspiration and were Somalia’s Zamzam Mohamed Farah and Djibouti’s Zourah Ali.

Both women competed in separate heats for the women’s 400m race. Despite each of these women coming in last, well-behind their fellow athletes, they will both be be remembered for their tenacious perseverance.

Gold, Silver and Bronze for East Africa in the women’s 10,000m race at his year’s London 2012 Olympics.

Ethiopia’s Tirunesh Dibaba defended her title and took home the gold medal, whilst Kenya’s Sally Jepkosgei Kipyego was winner of the silver medal followed by her fellow countrywoman Jepkemoi Vivian Cheruiyot won bronze.

South #Sudanese refugee to run #Olympic marathon as an independent
US-based Guor Marial has won the right to compete as a stateless athlete after refusing to compete under Sudan’s flag.
A refugee from Sudan's civil war has won his battle to compete in the Olympic marathon as an independent runner without a country.
US-based Guor Marial had turned down the chance to run for Sudan, could not represent America because he is not a full citizen and was unable to wear the colours of his first choice, South Sudan, because it is not sending a team to London.
But the 28-year-old’s late plea to enter as a stateless athlete under the Olympic flag has now been granted by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). Marial was preparing for a training session over the weekend when he got the career-changing call.
"I was getting ready to go for a run," Marial told the Associated Press from his home in Flagstaff, Arizona. "Wow. This is so exciting. It’s hard to describe. I’m speechless."
Marial lost 28 family members to violence or disease during the civil war that left Sudan devastated and eventually led to the south breaking away last year. He felt that representing Sudan would betray their memory, but competing in the Games this way will honour them.
He told Reuters: “For me, it means a lot to glorify the people who died for their freedom and people who lost their lives, including 28 members of my family and relatives. Their spirit is what allows me to get up every single day, put on my shoes and train to honour them.”
He has bleak childhood memories of the conflict. One night, soldiers raided his home, smashing his jaw with a rifle and knocking him unconscious. At the age of eight, he was forced to escape a labour camp after being kidnapped by gunmen. He hid in a cave until dawn, then followed the path of the sun.
"I used to hate running," he told AP. "I was running back home to save my life."
Marial lived in Egypt before reaching the US 12 years ago. He showed promise as a cross-country runner at Iowa State University. Last October he beat the Olympic marathon qualification time and in June improved his personal best to two hours, 12 minutes and 55 seconds.
South Sudan has been torn by economic collapse, tribal violence and a brewing conflict with its northern neighbour since becoming independent little more than a year ago. Establishing an Olympic body is hardly a priority and so it won’t be taking part in the Games.
(read more)

South #Sudanese refugee to run #Olympic marathon as an independent

US-based Guor Marial has won the right to compete as a stateless athlete after refusing to compete under Sudan’s flag.

A refugee from Sudan's civil war has won his battle to compete in the Olympic marathon as an independent runner without a country.

US-based Guor Marial had turned down the chance to run for Sudan, could not represent America because he is not a full citizen and was unable to wear the colours of his first choice, South Sudan, because it is not sending a team to London.

But the 28-year-old’s late plea to enter as a stateless athlete under the Olympic flag has now been granted by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). Marial was preparing for a training session over the weekend when he got the career-changing call.

"I was getting ready to go for a run," Marial told the Associated Press from his home in Flagstaff, Arizona. "Wow. This is so exciting. It’s hard to describe. I’m speechless."

Marial lost 28 family members to violence or disease during the civil war that left Sudan devastated and eventually led to the south breaking away last year. He felt that representing Sudan would betray their memory, but competing in the Games this way will honour them.

He told Reuters: “For me, it means a lot to glorify the people who died for their freedom and people who lost their lives, including 28 members of my family and relatives. Their spirit is what allows me to get up every single day, put on my shoes and train to honour them.”

He has bleak childhood memories of the conflict. One night, soldiers raided his home, smashing his jaw with a rifle and knocking him unconscious. At the age of eight, he was forced to escape a labour camp after being kidnapped by gunmen. He hid in a cave until dawn, then followed the path of the sun.

"I used to hate running," he told AP. "I was running back home to save my life."

Marial lived in Egypt before reaching the US 12 years ago. He showed promise as a cross-country runner at Iowa State University. Last October he beat the Olympic marathon qualification time and in June improved his personal best to two hours, 12 minutes and 55 seconds.

South Sudan has been torn by economic collapse, tribal violence and a brewing conflict with its northern neighbour since becoming independent little more than a year ago. Establishing an Olympic body is hardly a priority and so it won’t be taking part in the Games.

(read more)

OLYMPIC  FOCUS: Ezekiel Kemboi Cheboi (left)

Born May 25, 1982, Ezekiel Kemboi Cheboi is a Kenyan athlete, winner of the 3000 metres steeplechase at the 2004 Summer Olympics, the 2009 World Championships and the 2011 World Championships.

He became African Junior Champion in 2001 and came to prominence with a silver medal at the 2002 Commonwealth Games. Kemboi established himself as one the world’s foremost steeplechasers with a win at the 2003 All-Africa Games, a silver at the 2003 World Championships in Athletics, and then becoming the 2004 Olympic Champion. Over the next three years he obtained two more world silver medals and won at the 2006 Commonwealth Games.

Kemboi represented Kenya at the 2008 Beijing Olympics but managed only seventh – his worst performance on the global stage. He rebounded with a win at the 2009 World Championships (his first world gold medal) and took silver at the 2010 African Championships the following year. His 3000 m steeplechase best of 7:58.85 places him as the seventh fastest of all time.

He is one of only three men to have won both Olympic and World golds in the event, along with Reuben Kosgei and Brimin Kipruto

OLYMPIC  FOCUS: Tirunesh Dibaba
Born October 1, 1985 in Bekoji, Arsi, Ethiopia, Dibaba is the current Olympic 5000 metres and 10,000 metres champion, and the outdoor 5000 metres world record holder. She has also won four world track titles and five world cross country titles.
At the Olympic games, she won gold at the Beijing tournament in both the 5000m and 10, 000m races after having won bronze in Athens, 2004, in the 5000m race.
She is a member of the Oromo ethnic group, and was raised in the high-altitude Arsi Zone of the Oromia Region. Her nickname is the “Baby Faced Destroyer”.

OLYMPIC  FOCUS: Tirunesh Dibaba

Born October 1, 1985 in Bekoji, Arsi, Ethiopia, Dibaba is the current Olympic 5000 metres and 10,000 metres champion, and the outdoor 5000 metres world record holder. She has also won four world track titles and five world cross country titles.

At the Olympic games, she won gold at the Beijing tournament in both the 5000m and 10, 000m races after having won bronze in Athens, 2004, in the 5000m race.

She is a member of the Oromo ethnic group, and was raised in the high-altitude Arsi Zone of the Oromia Region. Her nickname is the “Baby Faced Destroyer”.

OLYMPIC  FOCUS: Meseret Defar Tola

Born 19 November, 1983 in Addis Ababa, Meseret Tola is a female long-distance runner from Ethiopia who competes chiefly in the 3000 metres and 5000 metres event, and has twice won medals at the Olympic games: gold in the 5000m at the 2004 Athens Olympic Games and bronze in the same race at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. 

Defar holds the indoor records for the 5000 metres, 3000 metres and two-mile run. She has dominated the 3000 m indoor event, winning the three consecutive gold medals at the IAAF World Indoor Championships.

OLYMPIC FOCUS: South Sudanese Olympian Lopez Lomong, who now represents the U.S., talks about the significance of the Olympics and the adversity he’s had to overcome to get where he is now.