DYNAMIC AFRICA

Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is diverse multi-media curated blog with a Pan-African outlook that seeks to create an expressive platform for African experiences, stories and African cultures.



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Posts tagged "amazigh"

Moroccan Amazigh artist Chama Mechtaly uses her artistic gift to channel and pay homage to her Jewish-Amazigh heritage, a part of her that was once suppressed by Morocco’s Arabization policies and sentiments that took ground following the country’s independence from France and Spain.

These oil paintings of Jewish-Amazigh women are often inspired from French colonial portraits and for Chama, this form of historical self-discovery not only helps her to retrace her ancestral identity, but has also served as a way for her to reposition herself as an African, rather than an Arab, and therefore part of the larger indigenous African landscape.

Read more about Chama.

October: Highlighting African Art & African Artists

amayas-amazigh:

Women amazigh of the Rif, Morocco

(via fyeahnorthafricanwomen)

Early 20th century photographs of Ouled Nail Imazighen (Berber) women from North Africa - mainly Algeria, but some sources also mention Tunisia.

These women were said to be professional belly dancers who earned a living by travelling from town to town, putting on performances that are said to have some times involved nudity.

Ornamented in distinctive jewelry and make up, some times also having facial tattoos, these women stood out from many other women in North Africa who, during this time, were often veiled in public at all times.

Further reading.

AUGUST: Celebrating African Women

amayas-amazigh:

Tamazight
Portrait of an amazigh woman

amayas-amazigh:

Tamazight

Portrait of an amazigh woman

(via fyeahnorthafricanwomen)

fyeahnorthafricanwomen:

La préparation, par Jean Dutey (1897-1954)

Two Amazigh women from Morocco looking out of a window as a photo of them is taken.

Mohammed Awzal (1680–1758) (Berber: Muḥemmed Awzal, Arabic: محمد أوزال‎), also known as Muhammad ibn Ali Awzal or al-Awzali was a religious Amazigh/Berber poet.
He is considered the most important author of the Teshelhit (southern Morocco Tamazight/Berber language) literary tradition.
He was born around 1680 in the village of al-Qasaba in the region of Sous, Morocco and died in 1758/9.
Almost a third of all known Shilha manuscripts contain parts of his works, and the largest Berber text in existence is a commentary by al-Hasan al-Tamuddizti (d. 1898) on Awzal’s al-Hawd.
Awzal, in his honor, is also the name of rhymed couplets and long poems that Ishilhin women chant daily or weekly, between the afternoon and sunset Islamic obligatory prayer times, in the tomb complexes of local holy figures.
Above is a picture of the first page of an 18th century Sous Berber manuscript of Muḥammad Awzal’s al-Ḥawḍ, part I (adapted from N. v.d. Boogert 1997 plate I).

Mohammed Awzal (1680–1758) (Berber: Muḥemmed Awzal, Arabic: محمد أوزال‎), also known as Muhammad ibn Ali Awzal or al-Awzali was a religious Amazigh/Berber poet.

He is considered the most important author of the Teshelhit (southern Morocco Tamazight/Berber language) literary tradition.

He was born around 1680 in the village of al-Qasaba in the region of Sous, Morocco and died in 1758/9.

Almost a third of all known Shilha manuscripts contain parts of his works, and the largest Berber text in existence is a commentary by al-Hasan al-Tamuddizti (d. 1898) on Awzal’s al-Hawd.

Awzal, in his honor, is also the name of rhymed couplets and long poems that Ishilhin women chant daily or weekly, between the afternoon and sunset Islamic obligatory prayer times, in the tomb complexes of local holy figures.

Above is a picture of the first page of an 18th century Sous Berber manuscript of Muḥammad Awzal’s al-Ḥawḍ, part I (adapted from N. v.d. Boogert 1997 plate I).

5centsapound:

Arwa Abouon was born May 3rd 1982 in Tripoli, Libya, to Amazigh roots from both her mother and father’s side of the family.

A native of North Africa; Amazigh means Free People. She received a BFA with distinction, majoring in Design from Concordia University in 2007.

Through her lighthearted photographs to graphic interventions, she questions her own place within a so-called Western culture on the one hand and an upbringing in a Muslim household on the other.

An Ouled Nail woman.

Etienne Dinet.

sarraounia:

Tifinagh calligraphy by Moulid, a great friend and extremely talented Amazigh artist from Taliouine (Morocco).

He uses traditional craft ink, natural saffron, grilled sheep hair soaked in water and industrial inks to realize his artworks. He also use various supports like cards, shoes, bags, dishes, towels, paper…

He has a studio in his hometown where he teaches Amazigh kids how to write using their own alphabet, his works are often exposed in Morocco and France and you can see more here.

MOROCCO. Oujda. Berber women. 1972.

© Bruno Barbey/Magnum Photos

(via tamza-d-amzew)

MOROCCO. Near Tabant (Ait Bouguemmez). Berber women cutting grass for their cattle fodder. 1988.

© Bruno Barbey/Magnum Photos

(via fyeahnorthafricanwomen)