DYNAMIC AFRICA

African-based news, lifestyle & popular culture platform that brings you stories and information concerning Africa and the African diaspora. Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is a rich content-driven creative space with a Pan-African outlook established as an expressive platform for African experiences, African culture and African stories.


Dynamic Africa is a diverse multimedia platform, which curates global ideas, memes, attitudes and other phenomena that shape popular culture, with both a local and global African perspective.




CONTACT: dynamicafricablog@gmail.com

all submissions via email only


PLEASE EMAIL US DIRECTLY ABOUT ANY COPYRIGHT ISSUES. THANK YOU.


INSTAGRAM FEED:


Recent Tweets @DynamicAfrica
Recommended
Posts tagged "Sports"

Recent six-time U.S. Open winner Serena Williams has been called everything from the greatest American tennis player ever, to America’s greatest athlete. But, unfortunately, these are not the only names and titles she’s been given.

It seems with every astounding win, people are out to crush her through the most despicable means. A mixture of sexism and racism at play, Serena highlights one thing about America (and perhaps the world): black women, no matter how accomplished, are undeserving of their accolades and, at worst, are stripped of their humanity time and time again.

From “The Frisky”:

Buried within the comments section of such stories of American victory, tells the reality that a Black woman does not represent America to White Americans. Nor is she worthy of support or even much deserved congratulations. The general consensus by such White people? Serena Williams, like President Obama, should be dehumanized and ridiculed merely because of her skin color. Here are some examples that represent the general consensus reached by many White commenters:

This paints a more clear picture of a modern White America that is not only racially intolerant but openly hateful. Through that lens, Serena’s strength cannot be appreciated as the strength of a woman because she is a Black woman — an animal at best and Obama’s son at worst. A vile, disgusting monkey with an attitude problem. The racial stereotypes invoked within those comment threads are attached to names and faces of individuals who are real. People whose profile pictures are sweet images of little, innocent children and babies, soldiers, both young and middle-aged White men and women smiling at the world in simple head shots. White people who obviously do not view Black people as people.

(read more)

Ghana and Nigeria to Represent Africa at Women’s U20 World Cup.

In a little over 24 hours, the 7th edition of the Women’s U20 World Cup kicks off in Toronto, Canada.

Ghana, one of the two African teams at the tournament, face the host nation on opening night and sit in a group with North Korea and Finland.

Fellow West Africans Nigeria sit in Group C with England, South Korea and Mexico, and play their first match on Wednesday against Mexico.

Join Dynamic Africa on Facebook and Twitter as we provide updates on the the two African teams at the tournament!

Kenyan Women Dominate 3000m Women’s Steeplechase Final and 10, 000m Race at Commonwealth Games.

It was a brilliant day for Kenyan athletics as the east African nation took home all three medals in the 3000m Women’s Steeplechase final at the current Games in Glasgow.

Coming in first at a time of 9:30.96 was runner Purity Cherotich Kirui, followed by fellow Kenyans Milcah Chemos Cheywa at 9:31.30 and
Joan Kipkemoi 9:33.34.

This win comes a day after another Kenyan clean sweep as Joyce Chepkirui led a Kenyan one, two, three in the Women’s gruelling 10,000m final, followed by Florence Kiplagat and Emily Chebet.

On day 10 of the 11 day event, Kenya is one of three African countries currently in the top ten of the overall medal standings chart.

With a total of 19 medals - 7 of them gold, Kenya sits in ninth position in-between South Africa and Nigeria.

Kenya have also won the Men’s 5000m, Women’s 800m, Women’s Marathon, Women’s 1500m, and the Men’s 3000m Steeplechase.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

Gold For Nigeria As Ese Brume Wins Commonwealth Games Women’s Long Jump.

Two celebrations were had at the Nigerian camp in Glasgow this past week as both Blessing Okagbare and Ese Brume won gold on the very same day.

Brume, who cites fellow long jumper Okagbare as her sports hero, cleared a height of 6.56m to win Nigeria’s second medal of the night.

Okagbare would have participated in this event but it clashed with her 200m race.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

Botswana’s Nijel Amos Wins Gold in Men’s 800m Final at Commonwealth Games.

Botswana claimed its first medal at this year’s Commonwealth Games after long-distance runner Nijel Amos finished ahead of Olympic champion David Rudisha of Kenya in the Men’s 800m final.

20-year-old Amos, who finished second to Rudisha at the London 2012 Olympic Games, clocked in at a time of 1:45.18 ahead of Rudisha’s 1:45.48.

South African Andre Oliever, Amos’ training partner, took home the bronze medal to make an all-African 1-2-3 finish in the race.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

Blessing Okagbare Claims Second Gold Medal at Commonwealth Games.

Nigerian sprinter Blessing Okagbare is going from strength to strength in Glasgow at the XX Commonwealth Games.

After winning gold in the Women’s 100m race and setting a new Commonwealth Games record, Okagbare claimed her second gold medal of the tournament after finishing first in the Women’s 200m ahead of England’s Jodie Williams and Bianca Williams.

Finishing at a time of 22.25, Okagbare made history once again, by becoming the first Nigerian ever to win an individual sprint double at a global sports meeting.

Okagbare has a chance to claim a third gold medal as she’ll be competing for Nigeria in the 4x100m Women’s relay event.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

Nigerian Gold Medalist Fails Drug Test At Commonwealth Games.

Nigerian gold medalist and 16-year-old weightlifting star Chika Amalaha has been provisionally suspended from the current Commonwealth Games, taking place in Glasgow, after failing an in-competition drug test.

Amalaha’s ‘A’ sample contained amiloride and hydrochlorothiazide, both of which are prohibited as diuretics and masking agents. She will now have a ‘B’ sample tested on Wednesday.

Speaking on the issue, Commonwealth Games Federation chief executive Mike Hooper said: ‘We [have] issued a formal notice of disclosure to an athlete following an adverse analytical finding as a consequence of an in-competition test. That athlete is Nigerian weightlifter Chika Amalaha who was tested on July 25th. That athlete has now been suspended from the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow.

'The relevant processes, as detailed in our anti-doping standard for the Games, are now being followed and Ms Amalaha has pursued her right to have her 'B' sample tested. This will take place at an accredited laboratory in London tomorrow (Wednesday), July 30. Upon receipt of those results the process will continue.'

This isn’t the first time a Nigerian lifter has been suspended for doping. However, what is shocking in this case is how young the athlete is. In 2001, the Nigerian Weightlifting Federation was suspended for repeated doping violations by the International Weightlifting Federation. They were also banned from competing in the Manchester Games the following year.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

South Africa Ranks Highest in Gold Medals amongst African Nations at Commonwealth Games.*

It’s day 6 of the XX Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, Scotland, and South Africa have fast edged their way to fourth position on the medals table with a total of 24 medals - 9 gold, 7 silver and 8 bronze.

Two of those gold medals were won by swimmer Chad le Clos who finished first place in both the 200m and 100m Men’s Butterfly races, setting two Commonwealth records in each. Clos has a total of five Glasgow Commonwealth medals: a silver for the Men’s 4 x 100m Freestyle Relay, and a bronze for the Men’s 4 x 200m Freestyle Relay and Men’s 50m Butterfly.

Fellow swimmer Cameron van der Burgh managed to win the Men’s 50m Breastroke winning gold and setting a new Commonwealth record in that race. Der Burgh won silver in the Men’s 100m Breaststroke behind Englishman Adam Peaty.

After beating New Zealand in the finals, the South African Rugby Sevens team won gold over the weekend making history as the first team ever to beat the Kiwis since the sport was introduced at the Commonwealth Games.

South Africa’s first gold medal was won in the Lawn Bowls after their mixed team beat the host nation 14-10 in the finals.

More Lawn Bowls victory came in the form of Prince Neluonde, Petrus Breitenbach, and Bobby Donnelly winning the Men’s Triples Gold Medal Match.

Paralympic sprinter Fanie van der Merwe won gold in the Men’s 100m T37 Final, and wrapping South Africa’s gold medalists (so far) is Zack Piontek who took home the judo Men’s -90kg Final first place title.

*South Africa has the most number of athletes of any African country.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

Blessing Okagbare Makes History For Nigeria at Commonwealth Games.

Nigerian athlete Blessing Okagbare sprinted to victory in Glasgow today winning gold in the women’s 100m race. Okagbare’s time of 10.85 established a new record for this event at the Commonwealth Games. She was followed by silver medalist Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica at a time of 11.03.

This marked the first time since 1994 that a Nigerian woman had won a medal in the women’s 100m the Commonwealth Games when Mary Onyali and Christy Opara-Thompson took home gold and silver respectively.

So far, all of Nigeria’s gold medals have been won by women.

17-year-old Chika Amalaha won the country’s first gold competing in the Women’s 56kg weightlifting, and fellow weightlifter Oluwatoyin Adesanmi won the women’s 63kg gold medal.

Nigeria leads overall in the weightlifting categories. for both male and female, with two gold, three silver and one bronze medal.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

Current Commonwealth Games Standings of African Teams.

The 20th Commonwealth Games officially kicked off four days ago in host city Glasgow, Scotland.

Africa is represented by 18 different countries namely Botswana, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. The Gambia withdrew from the Games in October 2013.

The 11-day event, ending on August 3rd, brings together a little under 5,000 athletes from 71 different countries and territories, competing in a series of 17 different sports and will see a total of 1,385 medals won.

In current medal standings, South Africa ranks highest amongst African nations and is the only African country in the top 10 (at position six) with a total of 14 wins so far - three gold, five silver and six bronze. Nigeria, at 11th place overall, just misses the top 10 with a total of four medals - one gold, two silver and one bronze.

The next ranking African country is Cameroon at 13th place overall - one silver and one bronze. Ghana, Mauritius and Zambia are tied for 20th place overall on the medals table, each with one bronze medal.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

Shujaa Misuli by Osborne Macharia.

Shujaa Misuli, meaning ‘muscle warriors’, is a photo project by Kenyan photographer Osborne Macharia that celebrates the diversity, dynamism and accomplishments of Kenyan athletes and sports heroes.

Click for descriptions and names of athletes.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | PinterestSoundcloud | Mixcloud

More African World Cup History Made As Algeria Defeat South Korea 4-2.

Just when we though things couldn’t get better for Africa at the World Cup, Algeria played a phenomenal game against South Korea scoring a total of four goals - the most scored by any African team in one match at the World Cup ever.

Algeria have qualified four times for the World Cup, in 1982, 1986, 2010 and of course, 2014. During their World Cup debut in 1982, they caused  “one of the great World Cup upsets on the first day of the tournament with a 2–1 victory over reigning European Champions West Germany.” This was also the last victory Algeria saw at the World Cup, until today.

South Korea did put up a good fight scoring two goals in the second half after being down 3-0 at half time. South Korea’s worst loss in World Cup history was in 1954 where Hungary beat them 9-0.

Algeria only need one more point to qualify for the next round.

They face Russia on Thursday.

"Africa Day" at the World Cup - the most fruitful day for African teams in Brazil so far.

A lot of history was made between the two African teams that played back-to-back at the World Cup on Saturday.

Although Ghana didn’t win their match against Germany, their 2-2 draw saw the Black Stars shinning in a way that proved that they are indeed a world class team worthy of a position in football’s biggest tournament. After scoring the equalizing goal for Ghana in the 54th minute, just three minutes after Germany’s first goal, 24-year-old French born winger Andre Ayew became the only Ghanaian player to score at all their 2014 World Cup matches so far. Along with Cote D’Ivoire’s Gervinho, Ayew is the top scoring African player at this year’s World Cup, so far.

As many wondered when Asamoah Gyan would finally show up at the World Cup, he delivered a stunning shot into Germany’s net less than 10 minutes after Ayew’s header. This made Baby Jet the top scoring African player of all time, at the World Cup, along with Cameroonian football legend Roger Milla.

During Nigeria’s game against Bosnia and Herzegovina, Peter Osaze Odemwingie’s winning goal ended the 16 year and nine game win-less drought for the Super Eagles at the World Cup. So far, Nigeria and Mexico are the only teams to not concede a goal at this year’s World Cup.

On Africa and the World Cup by Nate Holder.

We all know that Africa is not a country, nor are we a homogenous group of people aligned in culture and interest from Cape to Cairo. So why is that during the World Cup, individual African teams are burdened with being representatives of the entire continent?

One thing that has always caught my attention is how Africa and African football teams are spoken about at the World Cup. It seems as though the last African team left in the tournament somehow carries the hope of not only their nation, but the whole continent of Africa. Headlines such as ‘Ghana – Africa’s Best Hope in Tough World Cup Pool’ and ‘Why do African teams underperform at the World Cup?’ are common and go without questioning if the idea itself makes sense. The idea that African teams are spoken about in very different terms to teams from the rest of the world. Listen closely at how many times commentators and presenters will say things such as, ‘These players are not just representing their country, but are also representing Africa’.

Though Ghana were knocked out of the 2010 World Cup by Uruguay, the fact that they reached the quarterfinals was seen as not only a triumph, but a possible glimpse into the future as Ghana equaled the best result by an African team in World Cup history. Watching Luis Suarez’ handball and sending off, Asamoah Gyan’s subsequent penalty miss and Abreu’s audacious chip to win it was one of the most heartbreaking events in recent World Cup history. It endeared Ghana and in particular Asamoah Gyan, to hearts all over the world; not just African hearts.

In a BBC World Cup preview show some nights ago, Reggie Yates spoke about the history of African sides at the World Cup and about the chances of Ghana escaping the group of death this year. He quoted the African saying, ‘If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together’. But on a continent where approximately 2000-3000 different languages are spoken, not to mention possibly 8000 dialects, the idea of the “African proverb” makes no sense. Africa is not a country. To even think of referring to a saying as a “European” or “South American” proverb is almost unheard of, so why is Africa excluded from this consideration? Lately, in talk of the World Cup, it often seems as though Ghana, Cameroon, Ivory Coast, Nigeria and Algeria all get lumped together when the need to explain how they perform and where they come from arises.

Speaking of under-performing, do African teams really underperform?

If we go by appearances in the last 16 stage (that is countries that qualify from their group), we see that Africa is actually the 4th most successful continent over the last 6 World Cups. The 3rd most successful is North America, with 9 appearances in the knockout stages to Africa’s 5 (Asia has 4, while Oceania has 1). When it comes to quarter-final appearances however, Africa beats North America 3:1, with quarter-final appearances by Ghana (2010), Senegal (2002) and Cameroon (1990) to the one appearance by the USA in 2002. So in terms of progression in the tournament, African sides come in 3rd after Europe and South America. South Korea earned Asia’s only spot in the quarter finals of the 2002 World Cup and Oceania’s furthest foray was in the last 16 with Australia in 2006. So do African teams really under achieve? I’ll leave that to you to decide.

Did Germany carry the hopes of Europe when they reached the final of the 2006 World Cup? Do the defending champions Spain go into this years tournament being spoken of as Europe’s best hope of a World Cup? Much has been made of the socio-economic problems that Brazil has, and we have heard over and over again, that failure for Brazil to win the World Cup would be a disaster for its people. Would it be a disaster for the rest of the South American continent? Of course not. Perhaps many Argentinians would relish seeing Brazil knocked out before them. After all, Brazil represents Brazilians. Greece for Greeks. Iran for Iranians. Cameroon for…Africans? Sure many Africans will hope that other African side do well, but I’m sure an Ivorian would much prefer to see Ivory Coast progress rather than supporting the African nation with the best squad, out of a sense of ‘Africanism’?

If Nigeria reach the World Cup final against Brazil on the 13th July, many Africans will be cheering for Nigeria. Maybe, just maybe, there will also be some Africans watching the same game wearing Neymar Jr on their backs.

Read his blog and follow Nate Holder on Twitter.

Here’s how the world’s best would stack up in a World Cup with no first-generation immigrants.

With the current anti-immigrant sentiment sweeping many parts of the Western world gaining more and more traction, Global Post has taken on the conservative approach to this issue and applied strict immigration policies to the teams of the 2014 World Cup.

Global Post compiled the list by selecting only the group favorites and the “big losers.” Not all players are represented as they focused solely on those who are the most integral in their respective teams.

From their list, we’ve selected a few teams that represent the most black players, players of African descent and those whose background is related to Africa or the diaspora in some way.

ITALY:
Italy loses  Fiorentina forward Giuseppe Rossi was born in New Jersey and AC Milan striker Mario Balotelli, born in Palermo, has parents who immigrated from Ghana.

FRANCE:
France can hardly field a team without its immigrants. It drops Bacary Sagna and Mamadou Sakho, whose parents were born in Senegal, and Patrice Evra, who was born there. It also loses Blaise Matuidi, whose father was born in Angola; Eliaquim Mangala, whose parents were born in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rio Mavuba, whose father was born in Zaire and mother in Angola, Moussa Sissoko, whose parents were born in Mali; and Marseille midfielder Matthieu Valbuena, whose father was born in Spain. And don’t look for as much flash without Karim Benzema, whose father was born in Algeria. France also loses Paul Pogba, whose parents were born in Guinea.

GHANA:
Ghana keeps Kevin-Prince Boateng and gets back Jerome Boateng from Germany — their father was born in Ghana, though the brothers were born in Berlin. The same goes for  Jordan Ayew, whose parents were born in Ghana though he was born in France. As a final bonus, Ghana picks up AC Milan striker Mario Balotelli, whose biological parents were born in Ghana, from Italy. It also gets Danny Welbeck, whose parents were born in Ghana, from England.

GERMANY:
Germany lose superstar Arsenal midfielder Mesut Ozil, whose father was born in Turkey; Real Madrid midfielder Sami Khedira, whose father was born in Tunisia; and Lazio striker Miroslav Klose, who was born in Poland. They’ll also take the field without Bayern Munich defender Jerome Boateng, who has roots in Ghana; Sampdori defender Shkodran Mustafi, whose parents are Albanians born in Macedonia; and Lukas Podolski, who was born in Poland.

PORTUGAL:
Portugal loses Real Madrid defender Kepler Laveran Lima Ferreira, aka Pepe, to his native Brazil. It loses Fenerbahce S.K. Defender Bruno Alves, whose father was born in Brazil. It also drops Luis Carlos Almeida da Cunha, aka Nani, who was born in Cape Verde (independent from Portugal since 1975), and FC Porto winger Silvestre Varela, whose parents were born there. Lucky for them, Real Madrid striker Cristiano Ronaldo, whose great grandmother was from Cape Verde, isn’t an immigrant by our rules.

USA:
Tthe melting-pot nation loses Sunderland striker Jozy Altidore, whose parents were born in Haiti; Tim Howard, whose mother is Hungarian; AZ striker Aron Johannsson, who was born to Icelandic parents in Alabama; and Rosenborg midfielder Mix Diskerud, who was born in Norway. We’ll also take away LA Galaxy defender Omar Gonzalez, whose parents were born in Mexico, and Nantes midfielder Alejandro Bedoya, whose father was born in Colombia.

BELGIUM:
The fathers of both Manchester City defender Vincent Kompany and Everton striker Romelu Lukaku were born in what is today the Democratic Republic of Congo. Everton striker Kevin Mirallas’ father was born in Spain. Marouane Fellaini’s parents were born in Morocco. FC Zenit Saint Petersburgmidfielder Axel Witsel’s father is from France. And Tottenham Hotspur midfielder Mousa Dembele’s father was born in Mali.

(edited from source)

H/T katebomz