DYNAMIC AFRICA

Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is diverse multi-media curated blog with a Pan-African outlook that seeks to create an expressive platform for African experiences, stories and African cultures.



CONTACT: dynamicafricablog@gmail.com

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"Euphoria of two young men as they meet and greet each other"

Taken by Ambroise Ngayimoko, Angolan-born DRC photographer, in 1972.

#CHAN2014 Updates: who’s through to the semi-finals?

After being down 0-3 againnst the Lions of the Atlas Mountains, Nigeria beat Morocco 4-3, scoring 3 goals in the second half and their winning goal in extra time, to make it through to the semi-finals of the tournament.

Zimbabwe made history for qualifying for the semi-finals round for the first time ever in the team’s history after beating Mali 2-1.

The heated match between Libya and Gabon saw the former team qualified by beating Gabon 4-2 in penalties.

Ghana’s 1-0 win, with a goal that came about as a result of a penalty kick, was regarded with a lot of controversy by many DR Congo fans on twitter who claim the ref did not handle the game fairly.

Upcoming matches: Semi-Finals (Weds. 25th Jan)

  • Libya vs Zimbabwe - 5pm CAT
  • Nigeria vs Ghana - 8:30 CAT

(all images via CAF)

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All Africa, All the time.

Cape Town-based Congolese artist Zemba Luzamba's series titled La Sape, focusing on the Sapeur culture in Congo where men take pride in staying immaculately dressed in “gentleman-ly attire” mainly of Western origin.

October: Highlighting African Art & African Artists

There are strong cosmic elements embedded in the work of self-taught Kinshasa-born artist Amani Bodo whose surrealist paintings explore a diverse range of themes from spirituality and sexuality, to the impact and influence of Western culture in Congolese society.

October: Highlighting African Art & African Artists

Event: In this exhibition the artists Sammy Baloji and Patrick Mudekereza present us with a contemporary take on the colonial past.
 
As artists in residence in the museum they got carte blanche in the museum collections. In dialogue with scientists from the museum they have started working with a few collection pieces dating from the beginning of Congo’s colonial history.
 
These collection pieces exhale the atmosphere of the conquest of Congolese territory by the West. The leitmotif of the exhibition ‘Congo Far West’ refers not only to this territorial conquest, but also to the contemporary Congolese artists who artistically and intellectually recapture the collection pieces conserved in the West.

Patrick Mudekereza is a writer and poet but he also writes texts for comic strips, exhibitions and audiovisual art.    

During his time in the museum he is working on a hybrid sculpture entitled L’art au Congo which raises a whole host of questions, and treaties signed with a cross which sealed the transfer of land from the local chefs to Leopold II.
 
Photographer Sammy Baloji is working on a series of photographs and watercolours from a colonial exhibition led by Charles Lemaire.            

He has already exhibited in cities such as Paris, Bamako, Brussels, Cape Town and Bilbao. 

desert-dreamer:

Africa | Bakutu woman. Tshuapa, Bodende, Belgian Congo (today, the Democratic Republic of Congo) | C. Lamote. ca. 1957

desert-dreamer:

Africa | Kuba woman decorating raffia pile woven cloth, Mushenge, DR Congo | ©Eliot Elisofon. 1970

desert-dreamer:

Africa | Kuba woman decorating raffia pile woven cloth, Mushenge, DR Congo | ©Eliot Elisofon. 1970

(via thefemaletyrant)

Goma, DR Congo.

Photo by Alissa Everett

fotojournalismus:

N., 19 years old. Sex worker. DRC, June 2005.

“I work as a prostitute for four years now because I need the money. My family knows what I do and says nothing. I am together with my love (pimp) for seven years already even before beginning this work. He lives here with me. He’s always been against this work but since we have nothing there is no other choice. My friends pushed me into this. I had a child but he died from meningitis.”

From congo paradox

[Credit : Francesco Zizola]

(via artblackafrica)

Both in his photographs and in his short films Kiripi Katembo depicts the every day life of the inhabitants of Kinshasa as well as the instable political and economical context of his country.

Thanks to the use of the mobile phone or little video cameras he manages to film as close as possible to the street, avoiding the ban on filming of the Congolese government.

His works can also be more poetic, as in the series ‘un regard’… where he photographs people and landscapes reflection in the puddle of Kinshasa.

Kiripi Katembo Siku is a Goma-born and Kinshasa-based Congolese photographer and filmmaker. His first film Voiture en Carton was made with a cellphone and was selected at the “Pocket Film” Festival in the Centre Pompidou in Paris in 2008. Siku is also a co-creater of the association “YEBELA” that is made up of young directors and photographers whose work on video and photo projects depict the every day life of the of people Kinshasa.

AFTERNOON SONG: Bruce - Fally Ipupa

mwanakin:

Bruce by Fally Ipupa  ( this kid can sing!!!)

In light of the recent UN report that was published and circulated earlier this week, highlighting the ‘misdeeds’ of United Nations Peacekeeping forces globally - including sexual abuse, money laundering, fraud and illegal transportation of minerals across international borders, I remembered a highly disturbing documentary I watched in one of my political science classes whilst in college.

The documentary, ‘Blue Helmets: Peace & Dishonor’, focuses on the heinous sexual abuse crimes committed by UN peacekeeping forces in the Democratic Republic of Congo and other African countries.

Unfortunately, my internet won’t allow me to watch the film at a normal rate but based on my first viewing of the documentary, it provides a critical insight into the systematic criminal activities that take place through the abuse of power of UN peacekeeping forces, and the injustices that are insufficiently dealt with punished.

Born in 1948 in Kimbembele Ihunga, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, structural sculpture artist Bodys Isek Kingelez or Jean Baptiste is known for his incredibly detailed and colourful mixed-media architectural model-like sculptures which he calls "Architecture Maquettique".

Currently based in the capital city Kinshasa, Kingelez has been making these sculptures since the mid-1980s.