DYNAMIC AFRICA

African-based news, lifestyle & popular culture platform that brings you stories and information concerning Africa and the African diaspora. Set up in 2010, Dynamic Africa is a rich content-driven creative space with a Pan-African outlook established as an expressive platform for African experiences, African culture and African stories.


Dynamic Africa is a diverse multimedia platform, which curates global ideas, memes, attitudes and other phenomena that shape popular culture, with both a local and global African perspective.




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Posts tagged "1800s"

Roster of ‘new arrivals’ in Port Natal, in the British colony of Natal (present day South Africa). Indentured Indian labourers began arriving in 1860, and were identified only by number.

Photo courtesy of The Indian in Drum Magazine in the 1950s, edited by Naidoo (Bell-Roberts Publishing, 2009).

This image was originally published in Meet the Indian in South Africa (1950), State Information Office, Pretoria. Government Communication and Information System (GCIS).

(source)

blastedheath:

Theodore Wendel (American, 1859-1932), Portrait of a Moroccan Youth, 1886. Oil on canvas, 24 x 18 in.

nigerianostalgia:

A freed Yoruba slave from Bahia, Brazil. 1800s

(via lolwhitefeelings-deactivated201)

diasporicroots:

Amazon warriors from Dahomey

The Amazon Women of Dahomey, a precolonial West African kingdom, in the present-day Republic of Benin at the Crystal Palace exhibition. Circa 1893  

Barber shaving a boys head and man with water-pipe, by Felix Bonfils. ca. 1870s.

(via darkgirlswirl)

nigerianostalgia:

A group portrait of Yoruba women wearing Aso oke. 1890s.
Vintage Nigeria

A. James Gribble, inscribed:
Masupa. Kaffir* Chief & sons. Basutoland
South Africa, late nineteenth century
Albumen print

Basutoland or officially the Territory of Basutoland, was a British Crown colony established in 1884 after the Cape Colony’s inability to control the territory. It was divided into seven administrative districts; Berea, Leribe, Maseru, Mohales Hoek, Mafeteng, Qacha’s Nek and Quthing.

Basutoland was renamed the Kingdom of Lesotho upon independence from the United Kingdom on October 4, 1966.

*The word ‘kaffir’ is an derogatory slur that was used to refer to black people in South Africa. The original word is derived from Arabic and means ‘non-believer’.

Unidentified photographer
Native Policemen
South Africa, late nineteen century
from Albumen prints mounted to album page

Samuel Baylis Barnard, inscribed:
Damara Servant Girl, S. Africa
South Africa, late nineteenth century
Albumen print

J. E. Middlebrook (attr.), inscribed:
A Zulu girl. Hair strung with beads
South Africa, late nineteenth century

Lawrence Brothers, Cape Town (attr.), inscribed:
Kaffir* girl
South Africa, c. 1870s
Carte de visite

*The word ‘kaffir’ is an derogatory slur that was used to refer to black people in South Africa. The original word is derived from Arabic and means ‘non-believer’.

G. F. Williams
Studio photograph of two women
South Africa, c. 1870s
Carte de visite (postcard)

Gray Brothers (Diamond Fields), inscribed:
Zulu / Young Warrior in fighting order, and in skin Kaross. Armed with hatchet and assegai
South Africa. c. 1870s
Carte de visite

Unidentified photographer
Studio photograph of a man
East Africa, late nineteenth century
Albumen print

Apparently, this man is of Adendowa’ ethnicity, eastern Sudan.

Samuel Baylis Barnard, inscribed:
Zulu Kaffir*
South Africa, late nineteenth century
Albumen print

*The word ‘kaffir’ is an derogatory slur that was used to refer to black people in South Africa. The original word is derived from Arabic and means ‘non-believer’.