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Mohammed Awzal (1680–1758) (Berber: Muḥemmed Awzal, Arabic: محمد أوزال‎), also known as Muhammad ibn Ali Awzal or al-Awzali was a religious Amazigh/Berber poet.
He is considered the most important author of the Teshelhit (southern Morocco Tamazight/Berber language) literary tradition.
He was born around 1680 in the village of al-Qasaba in the region of Sous, Morocco and died in 1758/9.
Almost a third of all known Shilha manuscripts contain parts of his works, and the largest Berber text in existence is a commentary by al-Hasan al-Tamuddizti (d. 1898) on Awzal’s al-Hawd.
Awzal, in his honor, is also the name of rhymed couplets and long poems that Ishilhin women chant daily or weekly, between the afternoon and sunset Islamic obligatory prayer times, in the tomb complexes of local holy figures.
Above is a picture of the first page of an 18th century Sous Berber manuscript of Muḥammad Awzal’s al-Ḥawḍ, part I (adapted from N. v.d. Boogert 1997 plate I).

Mohammed Awzal (1680–1758) (Berber: Muḥemmed Awzal, Arabic: محمد أوزال‎), also known as Muhammad ibn Ali Awzal or al-Awzali was a religious Amazigh/Berber poet.

He is considered the most important author of the Teshelhit (southern Morocco Tamazight/Berber language) literary tradition.

He was born around 1680 in the village of al-Qasaba in the region of Sous, Morocco and died in 1758/9.

Almost a third of all known Shilha manuscripts contain parts of his works, and the largest Berber text in existence is a commentary by al-Hasan al-Tamuddizti (d. 1898) on Awzal’s al-Hawd.

Awzal, in his honor, is also the name of rhymed couplets and long poems that Ishilhin women chant daily or weekly, between the afternoon and sunset Islamic obligatory prayer times, in the tomb complexes of local holy figures.

Above is a picture of the first page of an 18th century Sous Berber manuscript of Muḥammad Awzal’s al-Ḥawḍ, part I (adapted from N. v.d. Boogert 1997 plate I).

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